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December, 2018
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Woody’s Round Up 12/31/18

Pixar In Concert, RenderMan, Round-Ups, Toy Story 4, Video Game

Posted by Simoa • December 31, 2018

Gather round for the final installment of Woody’s Round Up for 2018!

Glimpses and Peeps

Surprisingly, the Parrs weren’t on Pixar’s holiday card this year. (Can’t help but imagine a version with Jack-Jack taking on that raccoon in a picturesque Christmas scene…) The card however is quite lovely, and features characters from the 2019 feature, Woody and…Bo Peep!

Some fans started to speculate that the original romantic storyline between Bo and Woody was scrapped altogether. But her inclusion in the holiday card should lay those doubts to rest. Pixar may be taking their time to reveal Bo Peep in any of Toy Story 4′s promo, but that doesn’t mean she’s gone forever. In fact, quite the opposite. Over the summer, Bo’s voice actress Annie Potts enthused about her big role in the film. And that’s not all – she may even be getting a new look! I think we’re all in for a great surprise come next June.

Pixar in Concert

This series will be heading to four cities in the UK in April 2019. This UK tour will feature iconic music by a live orchestra from Coco, Finding Dory, Cars, Cars 2, the first two Toy Story films, Monsters, Inc., and more. For more information, please visit Broadway World.

Final Battle

The wait for Kingdom Hearts: Final Battle is almost over. The game will be released in just a few more weeks, and a new trailer was unveiled this month. Some familiar Pixar faces make appearances, like Remy, Woody, Buzz, Mike and Sulley. This latest trailer is pretty dramatic and has plenty of exciting moments, as well as some perilous ones. Watch it below:

Renderman’s 30th

The software program that revolutionized the VFX industry and continues to garner awards for groundbreaking effects turned 30 this year. Renderman first got its start at Pixar and is still an integral part of the studio. There’s a video over at Wired that breaks down the software’s sprawling history in honor of its 30th anniversary.

Monsters, Inc. Manga

Another January release: Tokyopop’s Monsters, Inc. manga. Tokyopop has other Disney titles in its catalog but this is just the second Pixar film to get the manga treatment, joining Finding Nemo. The story hasn’t changed, although the characters have a much more cutesy look, except Roz. Cover art is designed by Philly Delphie and Hiromi Yamafuji gets author credit. The manga hits bookstores on January 8th.

We hope you’ve all had a fantastic year! Join us in 2019 for more Pixar news and in the countdown to Toy Story 4. And if you’re currently experiencing cold temps, let Pixar’s fireplace warm you up!

Happy New Year!

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Toy Story That Time Forgot – The Pixar Special Of The Week

Short Film, Shorts, Toy Story, Toy Story That Time Forgot

Posted by Nia • December 21, 2018

Christmas is in a matter of days, so naturally it’s time to delve back into Toy Story That Time Forgot, one of the most underrated Pixar projects. The holiday special aired back on December 2nd, 2014 on ABC.

Although this is a Christmas special, the film starts off post-Christmas as we open with Bonnie playing with her toys, a comforting and familiar sight. We’re immediately re-introduced to Trixie the Triceratops but we quickly find out she’s constantly disappointed Bonnie never lets her play as the true dinosaur she is; instead she takes on other random roles during playtime. Jessie, Rex, and Mr. Potato Head are quick to offer support for Trixie, mentioning she will get her chance to be a dinosaur soon (as there will be many more opportunities) but that doesn’t lift Trixie’s spirits. Shortly after, Bonnie attends a play-date at her best friend Mason’s house. Luckily for us Bonnie brings along a few of our other favorite toys from the Toy Story universe: Woody, Buzz, and Rex. She even brings Trixie along and a new ornament named Angel Kitty.

As soon as Bonnie arrives she notices Mason enjoying his new video game and before she joins him, she dumps the toys into Mason’s playroom. The video game wasn’t the only thing Mason got for Christmas; he also got a slew of new warrior dinosaur toys called the Battlesaurs. The gang is quickly introduced to Reptillus Maximus and the Cleric, who are in control of the Battlesaurs army. Naturally, Rex and Trixie are welcomed as part of the clan by Reptillus and shown around their Batteopolis but the Cleric secretly takes Woody, Buzz, and Angel Kitty away as his prisoners.

Trixie and Reptillus quickly bond (naturally). Since Trixie is finally around other toys like her and it’s easy to see why she’s so quick to fall head over heels for Reptillus. Trixie can’t help but praise the Battlesaurs and how they’ve made their life work in Mason’s toy room. Reptillus is even captivated by Trixie’s world of make believe. Soon the two dinosaurs are called to the aptly named “Arena of Woe,” where to Trixie’s dismay, this world of dinosaurs isn’t as perfect or as nice as she thought. In the arena, its Mason’s toys against Reptillus; we soon see that Reptillus completely destroys the other toys in combat. No one has a chance against him.

Things soon get worse when Woody and Buzz enter the arena; it turns out the Cleric wanted Woody and Buzz destroyed from the get-go and it’s the reason why they were taken away so abruptly at the start. Buzz and Woody barely escape their fight against Reptillus before Trixie jumps in to help her friends. It turns out, the Battlesaurs are so hostile because they haven’t had the opportunity to play with Mason yet, since Mason has been too caught up in his new video game. Despite Trixie pleading for the dinosaurs to stop fighting her friends, they bring in another massive Battlesaur named Goliathon, who swallows Woody, Buzz, and Angel Kitty. As Trixie tries to free her friends from Goliathon, she’s knocked over and reveals Bonnie’s name written on her hand. To these Battlesaurs, that’s a sign of weakness and equivalent to someone waving a white flag. Suddenly Trixie is no longer welcome as one of them.

The biggest twist of this special is that the Cleric has known the Battlesaurs were toys the entire time. It was the Cleric’s motivation to keep the toys oblivious to this fact so he can continue basking in his power and ruling over them. Now that Woody, Buzz, and Angel Kitty know that information, he takes them off to be shredded in a nearby ventilation fan.

As Woody and Buzz are trying to escape the Cleric, Trixie nearly unplugs Mason’s video game, in an attempt to thwart his attention and get him to play with the other Battlesaurs. Reptillus intervenes and tries to stop her but Trixie has an epiphany of her own. She manages to persuade Reptillus that it’s almost a blessing being a toy; she speaks to him about how important and meaningful it’s been to be a toy and play with Bonnie every day. She even shows Reptillus the box he came in, which changes his whole perspective.

Reptillus turns off Mason’s video game and “surrenders” to the humans. Soon Bonnie and Mason find Reptillus, and the children agree to go to Mason’s playroom to continue their play-date. The duo arrive just in time, saving Woody and Buzz from being destroyed in the ventilation fan.

Reptillus and the other Battlesaurs are changed by their play-date with Bonnie and Mason; they’re quick to accept their fate as toys and learn to enjoy a calmer life in Mason’s home.

Towards the end of the special, Trixie realizes how important she is in Bonnie’s life and she professes to Woody, Buzz, and the other toys how she would be anything Bonnie wants her to be during playtime, even if that never is a dinosaur.

One of the most impressive elements about this film is the fact it delves deep into the toys existence. It touches the surface of their psychology and how they view their lives when it comes to interacting with characters like Bonnie and Mason. The toys obviously realize they’re toys and figure out their purpose in life, but through that they learn the importance of their existence and that they have these unique gifts; each toy offers something different to children. It’s also interesting to see the differences in how a toy acts before they’ve had the opportunity to be played with or to have a child “mark” them with their name – the Battlesaurs were almost savage, like untrained cats, before they were played with for the first time. I’m curious to see how they will continue this theme in the upcoming Toy Story 4 film, especially with Forky.

Some fun facts about Toy Story That Time Forgot:

  • When it comes to the Toy Story timeline, this film is set before the story that’s going to be depicted in the upcoming Toy Story 4 film.
  • This film was initially set to be a 6-minute short, but it was John Lasseter who suggested it be a holiday special because he loved the story so much and wanted to explore the themes and characters more.
  • It took 3 years to create; 2 of those years were spent on story development.
  • The special was the last time Don Rickles voiced the iconic Mr. Potato Head; he died in 2017.
  • This was Pixar’s second Toy Story-esque TV special; the first one was Toy Story of Terror!
  • Don’t forget that in the first Toy Story film, Buzz was the one who first refused to believe he was a toy. It’s funny seeing that shift in this special; he was almost outraged that the Battlesaurs didn’t know they were toys.
  • There is a reference to Star Wars in Toy Story That Time Forgot, when the Cleric says the line, “I find their lack of armor disturbing.” Can you Star Wars fans figure out the line it’s referring to?

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Oscar-Shortlisted Bao Available On YouTube For One Week

Bao, Oscars, Shorts

Posted by Joanna • December 18, 2018

A lot has been said about “Bao”, Pixar’s most recent short, this year. It’s Pixar’s first short directed by a woman (Domee Shi), and has been deservingly praised for its personal and heartfelt representation of Chinese culture. It has also sparked a lot of conversations – the story of “Bao” is equally beautiful and weird, which is probably exactly the feel Shi and the crew were going for.

It’s not surprising, then, that “Bao” has been shortlisted for the 2019 Oscars. The final list of nominees for the “Best Animated Short” category will be released on January 22nd.

In other news, while Incredibles 2 did pick up some Annie Award nominations, “Bao” has been overlooked.

If you’re needing a reminder of “Bao”‘s unique story, then you’re in luck! It’s currently available on YouTube for one week. This is something that doesn’t happen very often. The only other short that Pixar have released on their YouTube channel is “George and AJ” back in 2009.

It’ll be interesting to see if this becomes a trend. For now, though, we’ll just have to savour this one week of “Bao” in YouTube form – including the comment section! The YouTube comment section can sometimes be a dangerous place, but it’s great to see so many comments full of interesting insights, praise and adoration.

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Brad Bird talks about Pixar’s bright future and more

1906, Brad Bird, Incredibles 2

Posted by Simoa • December 17, 2018

The Incredibles 2 director was a guest on Deadline’s Crew Call podcast recently. The film has enjoyed massive success since its June debut earlier this year, and has earned an impressive number of nominations at the Annies and Golden Globes. Bird mainly discussed the notable improvements in CGI, a huge leap from the “edge of failure” he and the crew were on in the first film. The technology is continuously evolving with dazzling results.

via Parade

Bird also spoke about his live action ventures. His 1906 epic about that year’s devastating San Francisco earthquake was never formally greenlit due to problems with budget and the story. Bird revealed that tackling the story has posed the most significant obstacle, but he remains enthusiastic about it nonetheless. The film was originally going to be produced by both Pixar and Warner Bros. Is there a chance it could still see the light of movie screens someday? Bird hopes so. But he’s also working on another live action project! He couldn’t say any more beyond that (of course), but it will feature twenty minutes of animation. Immediately I thought of “The Origins of Plus Ultra,” a seriously cool animated sequence that was ultimately cut from Bird’s Tomorrowland.

Besides discussing his films and upcoming projects, Bird offered his thoughts on Pixar’s new direction. I believe this is the first time someone at the studio has directly addressed John Lasseter’s departure. Bird didn’t comment on the allegations of misconduct against the former studio chief, but he did remark positively on where Pixar is headed.

“As long as I’ve been at Pixar, Pixar has been changing. […] It’s never really been exactly the same place, it can’t stay frozen in amber. There’s too many people, and times change and experiences change…There’s an amazing collection of talent there and the foundation of supporting filmmakers’ visions that is kind of, the secret sauce to Pixar’s enduring, continuing success. So I think there is a very bright future for Pixar.”

Brad Bird’s optimism is encouraging and justified. Just as the technology evolves, so does the studio.

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Lava: The Pixar Short of The Week

James Ford Murphy, Lava, Pixar Short Films Collection, Pixar Short of the Week, Short Film, Shorts

Posted by Simoa • December 14, 2018

This week, “Lava” was the overwhelming favorite in our latest twitter short film poll.

I have to admit, I was more than a bit surprised that “Lava” won, and by such a large margin. I remember the short being distinctly unpopular when it first premiered in 2015, paired with Inside Out. There were lots of complaints about “Lava,” ranging from the story (or lack thereof) to the character designs. And while some of those negative responses are reasonable (to an extent), I think this short does have its merits. Maybe “Lava” isn’t technically or narratively groundbreaking, but it doesn’t have to be.

I saw Inside Out nine times in theaters, which means I also saw “Lava” nine times! And at almost every viewing, the reaction to Uku, the male volcano, opening his mouth to sing was derisive laughter. I couldn’t ever see what was so funny about it. What made me laugh wasn’t the short itself, but my mother’s wry observation at its conclusion: “Well, there’s someone for everybody.” And isn’t that just like Pixar, to not only anthropomorphize volcanoes, but make them yearn for romance and everlasting love? Sure, as someone in one of the above critical pieces noted, Pixar already did it before with umbrellas…but these are volcanoes! Massive ruptures in the earth’s crust that literally erupt fire and destroy everything in their path. But the volcanoes in “Lava” are gentle, with friendly faces and sweet singing voices.

Uku (Kuana Torres Kahele) is a lonely volcano in the middle of the sea who sings about finding his one true love.

“I wish that the earth, sea, and the sky up above-a
Will send me someone to lava.”

Thousands of years pass and he remains alone, literally eroded and sinking into the sea. One of the most brilliant moments of the short is the time lapse representing all these years.

via Giphy

And how quietly devastating is the sight of a volcano on the brink of extinction, never once experiencing the love that all the animals around him do? Turtles, dolphins, birds — all have a special someone, except for this craggy mountain of rock. He once bloomed in verdant greens, with bright sparks of red-orange lava, but all of that rich color and life disappear.

But not all hope is lost. Lele (Napua Greig) is an underwater volcano who believes Uku’s song is for her. She bursts forth to the surface while Uku descends into the sea. When she starts singing his song, Uku, reinvigorated by music and love, rises back up to join her, and they form an island called Ukulele.

“Lava” is considered by many to be Pixar’s weakest. Some people are a bit more extreme in their assessment, calling it the worst thing Pixar has ever made, offensive (!), worthless, total garbage. Dana Stevens over at Slate declared it an embarrassingly terrible horror show, but only after she spent four long winded paragraphs talking about other film releases in 2015. Truly bizarre! I might not agree with my nephew that “Lava” is Pixar’s greatest short, but I definitely trust his opinion more than anyone else’s.

concept art

Director James Ford Murphy was inspired by his love of Hawaii, where he honeymooned with his wife over 25 years ago. He also wrote the short’s eponymous song and first pitched it at Pixar by singing and playing it on his ukulele. The song’s inspiration came from Hawaiian singer Israel Kamakawiwo’ole’s beautifully haunting rendition of “Over the Rainbow,” which is very meaningful to Murphy. What he really wanted was to create something just like it in movie form.

There’s also the level of immaculate detail we usually expect from Pixar, particularly the inspiration from actual volcanic geology. Murphy also incorporated Lōʻihi, an underwater volcano, into the short. Lōʻihi formed the basis for “Lava,” as Murphy wondered if this volcano knew about Hawaii (the Big Island) and vice versa.

What I love most about the short’s backstory is that Lōʻihi came to represent Murphy’s sister, who married in her 40s.

“As my sister stood up on the altar, I thought about how happy she was and how long she’d waited for her very special day. There, at my sister’s wedding, I remembered Loihi and I had an epiphany… What if my sister was a volcano? And what if volcanoes spend their entire lives searching for love, like humans do?”

We got the answer in a sweet 7 minute musical.

Some fun facts:

  • Uku and Lele’s eyes were originally lava, but the result was creepy and they ended up looking too much like jack-o-lanterns.
  • The clouds around the two volcanoes were based on weather patterns and were also meant to resemble hula skirts and leis.
  • The voices of Uku and Lele, Kuana Torres Kahele and Napua Greig, found out they had both attended hula school together when they met in the recording studio.
  • Did you know the Pizza Planet Truck appears in the short? Look very closely at one of the constellations in the sky during the time lapse!

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“Onward” – Title And Cast For 2020 Original Pixar Feature Announced

Dan Scanlon, Suburban Fantasy Film

Posted by Joanna • December 12, 2018

Pixar have announced the title for their next original feature releasing on March 6 2020 – Onward. 


Up to this point, Onward (which has been described as a ‘modern fantasy’ film), directed by Dan Scanlon (Monsters University) and produced by Kori Rae, has been under the working title “The Untitled Pixar Film That Takes You To A Suburban Fantasy World“. It was first announced at the 2017 D23, and takes place in a world where fantasy has almost become mundane. Chris Pratt and Tom Holland will play the teenage elf brothers who set out on a journey together in the hopes of rekindling magic and spending one last day with their late father.

Julia Louis-Dreyfus and Octavia Spencer have also been revealed as cast members. This isn’t Louis-Dreyfus’ first time lending her voice to a Pixar character – she voiced Princess Atta in A Bug’s Life way back in 1998!

The film is inspired by Scanlon’s own life and relationship with his brother – Scanlon’s father passed away when he was only a year old. Now that the title has officially been revealed, we can all look forward to more plot and character details being released.

Following the official release of the title, Pixar employees on Twitter have been expressing their excitement about working on the film. Pixar animator Austin Madison compared Onward to a Tolkien story, suggesting that this is a kind of fantasy that the studio has never explored before.

If you’ve ever wondered what it would be like if John Hughes directed a Tolkien story, you may want to join our quest.

Tolkien stories tend to have epic journeys, incredible amounts of lore, strong bonds between characters, and a lot of heart. We never knew that Pixar tackling a Tolkienesque fantasy feature was a thing that we needed, but this news has made the wait for Onward (or at least some more news on it) all the more excruciating.

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Day & Night – The Pixar Short Of The Week

Day & Night, Pixar Short of the Week, Short Film, Shorts, Teddy Newton

Posted by Joanna • December 7, 2018

“Day & Night” is the much-loved Pixar short that played before Toy Story 3 in 2010, and it still stands as one of the most unique shorts in the studio’s history.

It explores the inspired 2D-3D world of Day and Night – two polar opposite characters with, to begin with, a total lack of empathy for each other. The short opens with a fully 3D animated scene, and the audience is lulled into a false sense of familiarity: Pixar does 3D animation! This is what we’ve all come to expect (the genius Ratatouille short “Your Friend the Rat” is a clear exception here, along with lots of creative credits scenes). This is where “Day & Night” hits us with the first of many clever surprises – this 3D world we’ve been looking at is all inside not one, but two 2D animated characters. Inside Day are sunny fields, bright mornings and singing birds, while inside Night are moonlit meadows, glinting stars and chirping crickets.

These two characters live in the same world – in fact, the entire short only uses a single camera – but the “Day & Night” crew managed to pull off this seamless day-night contrast between scenes inside each of the characters. They live in the same world, but they see it so differently. It’s only as they discover more about each other that they begin to see the beauty in their opposite’s perspective. This is such an important message – one that can apply to absolutely everyone who’s had the joy of watching the short.

There are so many things to appreciate about “Day & Night”: the particularly relevant message, the knitting together of wildly different animation techniques, the use of sound… Initially, director Teddy Newton wanted to use only natural sounds to create the soundtrack of the film, but eventually Michael Giacchino was enlisted to compose music for it too. The music was only used where music would naturally be – playing on a radio on the beach, or blasting out of Las Vegas casinos.

There are so many smart visual and audio gags in “Day and Night” – ducks quacking to mimic laughter, squeaky bicycle wheels to imitate Day rubbing his eyes. Here, Night is hanging off a cliff edge.

The finale to “Day & Night” is perhaps what sticks with people the most – Day and Night are distracted by a radio broadcast, which is a snippet from a Dr Wayne Dyer (author and motivational speaker) lecture.

“Fear of the unknown. They are afraid of new ideas. They are loaded with prejudices, not based upon anything in reality, but based on … if something is new, I reject it immediately because it’s frightening to me. What they do instead is just stay with the familiar. You know, to me, the most beautiful things in all the universe are the most mysterious.”

It’s after hearing this recording that Day and Night finally understand the beauty in one another’s world views – it’s people’s differences that make our world so full of wonder. A synchronised sunrise and sunset show that Day and Night may be very different, but it’s still possible to connect with one another.

In the commentary for “Day & Night” from director Teddy Newton and Camera Polisher and Stereographer Sandra Karpman, Newton comments on the fact that many viewers’ favourite part is when Day and Night almost seem to become each other and switch places. He explains that they don’t turn into each other. “They’re still who they are. They’re still the same person. It’s just that the thing inside them has changed. They come out of the experience seeing the world in a new way, empathising with the other’s world view.”

That’s a pretty brilliant message to be putting out there.

Some fun facts:

  • Director Teddy Newton would hear this recording of Dr Wayne Dyer while he was growing up because his mother owned an audio recording of one of his lectures. He felt the quote so perfectly fit the theme of “Day & Night” and it couldn’t not be included.
  • Pixar treated Dr Wayne Dyer to a screening of “Day & Night” as a way of saying thank you.
  • Initially, Newton came up with the idea of a keyhole character with the 3D world inside it. In the end, he decided the characters needed to be more mobile to be able to tell a story, so the keyhole concept gradually evolved into the walking and (kind of) talking Day and Night characters that we see now.
  • Newton lent his voice to Chatter Telephone in Toy Story 3 and Mini Buzz in the Toy Story Toon “Small Fry”.

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Woody’s Round Up 12/7/18

Disney Parks, Inside Out, Luxo, Jr., Round-Ups, Teddy Newton, Toy Story 4, Toy Story Land

Posted by Simoa • December 7, 2018

Welcome back to Woody’s Round Up! With all the speculation about Toy Story 4 and the excitement over the Annie and Golden Globe nominations for Incredibles 2, some other noteworthy happenings may have slipped your radar. But no worries, we’ve compiled a list here.

Jolly Holiday at Toy Story Land

Toy Story Land has been decorated just in time for Christmas and the holidays! I’m especially fond of this giant Hamm sugar cookie complete with Santa Hat:

Hope they’ll be selling edible versions in the park…

And check out these ornaments I definitely want on my tree at home!

You can see more of the decorations on the Disney Parks blog. Here’s a video of the decorations going up:

Light it Up Luxo

Pixar Pier at Disneyland also got a lovely addition in the form of animatronic Luxo Jr. atop the marquee. While the technology has not yet evolved for Luxo to bound off its perch and stomp anywhere (or on anything), it would be quite a treat to be welcomed by the energetic lamp to California Adventure. Watch Luxo in action below:

More photos at Laughing Place.

Tears of Candy Galore

Bing Bong’s Sweet Shop opened at Pixar Pier over the summer, and a new statue has been installed inside.

Bing Bong isn’t animatronic, but he does play audio from Inside Out, as reported by WDW News Today. I’m sure everyone who visits will be crying happy tears too! They just won’t taste as sweet.

Teddy Newton’s Sneaks

Teddy Newton, mastermind behind some of Pixar’s most brilliant story ideas and indelible artwork, as well as the director of ‘Day & Night’ will be directing his first feature length film! Although not a Pixar production, Sneaks is worth supporting. The official synopsis describes it as follows:

Sneaks centers on a group of misplaced sneakers that end up lost in New York City and must find a way to work together in order to get back to their “sole mates.”

The film will also be Ohio’s first animated feature, and Pixar production designer Ricky Nierva will also be part of the crew. It’s always wonderful to see Pixarians branching out, and we wish them both great success. Read more about Sneaks at THR.

Expanding Toy Story

A Toy Story 4 graphic novel anthology will be hitting shelves ahead of the film’s release next June. Released by Dark Horse comics in collaboration with Pixar, the anthology is available for preorder on Amazon, Barnes and Noble, and comic book stores. More details and art will surface before the May 7th release date, so stay tuned for more!

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Incredibles 2 Nominated for Golden Globe Award

Awards, Brad Bird, Golden Globes, Incredibles 2

Posted by Joanna • December 6, 2018

The nominations for Incredibles 2 keep rolling in – just after receiving 11 nominations at the Annie Awards, it has now been nominated for Best Animated Motion Picture at the 76th Annual Golden Globe Awards.

Incredibles 2 sits amongst fellow worthy nominees Isle of DogsMiraiRalph Breaks The Internet, and Spider-Man: Into The Spider-Verse.

The Golden Globe awards will air on January 6th, so we’ve just got a month until we find out the result! Regardless of the outcome, it’s great to see Incredibles 2 receiving so much praise – we’re beyond happy for the entire crew.

Following the nomination announcements, director Brad Bird revealed that he was initially worried the sequel wouldn’t prove as popular as the original – he was afraid superheroes wouldn’t be ‘in’ any more. (Ironic, given the fact that the new animated Spider-Man movie has also been nominated for best animated feature.) But he realised that Incredibles is more than a superhero movie – family is at the core of these films, even during those classic fight scenes.

“I thought, two years from now — because it takes a while to make these things — are people going to be sick of superheroes? But then I remembered that what drew me to the idea and made the idea appealing to me in the first place was that it was primarily a film about families — and they just happened to be superheroes. And to me, family is an endlessly fascinating subject because it’s in everyone’s lives.”

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Incredibles 2 scores 11 Annie Award nominations!

Annie Awards, Brad Bird, Incredibles 2

Posted by Simoa • December 3, 2018

It’s a little hard to believe that awards season is very nearly upon us! The 46th Annual Annie Awards, which honors achievements in animation, released its list of nominees today, and Incredibles 2 has been nominated in nearly every category for animated feature. Take a look at the list below.

Best Animated Feature

Outstanding Achievement for Animated Effects in an an Animated Feature Production
Nominees: Greg Gladstone
Tolga Göktekin
Jason Johnston
Eric Lacroix
Krzysztof Rost

Outstanding Achievement for Character Animation in an Animated Feature Production
Nominee: Lance Fite

Outstanding Achievement for Character Design in an Animated Feature Production
Nominee: Matt Nolte

Outstanding Achievement for Directing in an Animated Feature Production
Nominee: Brad Bird

Outstanding Achievement for Music in an Animated Feature Production
Nominee: Michael Giacchino

via /film

Outstanding Achievement for Storyboarding in an Animated Feature Production
Nominees: Dean Kelly
Bobby Rubio

Note: Kelly and Rubio were each nominated separately, so the film received 11 nominations in total.

Outstanding Achievement for Voice Acting in an Animated Feature Production
Nominee: Holly Hunter

Outstanding Achievement for Writing in an Animated Feature Production
Nominee: Brad Bird

Editorial in an Animated Feature Production

Nominees: Stephen Schaffer, ACE
Anthony J. Greenberg
Katie Schaefer Bishop

Congratulations to Brad Bird and crew for their well deserved nominations! Pixar’s production designer Ralph Eggleston will also receive the Winsor McCay Lifetime Achievement Award. Adam Burke, Pixar animator who passed away earlier this year, will also be honored with the June Foray Award.

The Annie Awards will be broadcast on February 2, 2019.

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