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New Disney/Pixar Gallery Nucleus Exhibition Opens in Los Angeles

30 Years of Pixar, A Bug's Life, Art, Cars, Cars 2, Finding Dory, Finding Nemo, Inside Out, John Lasseter, Monsters University, Monsters, Inc., Ratatouille, The Incredibles, Toy Story, Toy Story 2, Toy Story 3, WALL-E

Posted by Nia • December 10, 2016

Have you ever wanted to see some of your favorite artwork from Pixar films in real life? Fear no more, as a new exhibition has just opened up at Gallery Nucleus in LA today. For the first time ever, the gallery will be showcasing brand new images from each of Pixar’s feature films. What makes it even more unique is that John Lasseter himself picked each design for the show. There will also be hand-signed limited edition prints for sale by each artist who worked on the pieces.

Thanks to Oh My Disney for providing the artwork that will be featured at the showcase.

By Bob Pauley

By Bob Pauley

 

By Tia Kratter

By Tia Kratter

 

By Randy Barret

By Randy Barret

 

By Pete Docter

By Pete Docter

 

By Ralph Eggleston

By Ralph Eggleston

 

By Teddy Newton

By Teddy Newton

 

By Bill Cone

By Bill Cone

 

By Dominique Louis

By Dominique Louis

 

By Ralph Eggleston

By Ralph Eggleston

 

By Lou Romano

By Lou Romano

 

By Robert Kondo

By Robert Kondo

 

By Harley Jessup

By Harley Jessup

 

By Steve Pilch

By Steve Pilch

 

By Rickey Nierva

By Rickey Nierva

 

By Ralph Eggleston

By Ralph Eggleston

 

By Sharon Calahan

By Sharon Calahan

 

By Daniel L Munoz

By Daniel L Munoz

 

Be sure to check out Galley Nucleus and celebrate the art of Pixar if you’re in town – it runs from today, December 10th to January 8th, 2017.

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In depth: Finding Dory, sequels, and Pixar heroines

Cars 2, Cars 3, Finding Dory, in depth, Monsters University, Pixar, Pixar Heroines, sequels, The Incredibles 2, Toy Story 3, Toy Story 4

Posted by Simoa • June 29, 2016

This post is the first in a new feature on Upcoming Pixar where we offer a closer look at Pixar films.

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Dory – everyone’s favorite forgetful blue tang. She’s so beloved that she nearly swims away with Finding Nemo. Nearly, but not quite. One reason why that film is such an unparalleled Pixar entry is because Dory as the scene stealing, ebullient comic relief doesn’t ever overshadow Marlin. We still care about him even though he’s not immediately lovable. (Or arguably, lovable at all).

Now Dory has a movie of her very own. She’s not stealing any scenes because they all belong to her.

In retrospect, focusing the sequel on Dory makes a lot of sense. Andrew Stanton crafted an emotionally resonant story with talking fish that was based on his own observations of fatherhood. That story was finished for the most part. But a new one centered on the silly, eccentric, and carefree secondary character held an ocean of possibility.

Of course, Dory isn’t the first goofy Pixar sidekick to become a protagonist in her own film. Mater was the first in Cars 2. But Finding Dory, unlike Cars 2, was enthusiastically accepted by most. While I do enjoy the latter film, I can understand why others have never been thrilled about a Mater centric movie. Cars 2 was disappointing to many because there was nothing meaningful underneath the hoods. Pixar films can just be fun diversions, but that’s a post for another day. But to everyone’s collective relief, the emotional stakes are higher in Finding Dory. Dory’s presence in Finding Nemo makes that film all the more poignant because her silliness contains pathos. She’s not just the hilarious sidekick.

“Please don’t go away. Please? No one’s ever stuck with me for so long before.”

“And…and I look at you, and I’m home! Please…I don’t want that to go away. I don’t want to forget.”

Is it any wonder that Andrew Stanton felt “very worried about Dory and couldn’t stop thinking about how she needed closure”?

Stanton didn’t work on the sequel right away. It wasn’t until 2011, eight years after Finding Nemo, that he began to consider it. And it clearly took more time to tackle the story before it was officially announced and released into the ocean five years later. This is the usual way sequels are handled at Pixar, with the exception of Toy Story 2. That film had to be salvaged on a tight deadline which makes it all the more impressive.

For all the worry about “Pixar’s decline” and reliance on sequels, critics and fans should rest assured. Finding Dory may not be as seamless as its predecessor, but its story is still meaningful. Art continues to challenge, technology continues to inspire.

Finding Dory should assuage worry in the same way Toy Story 2 and Toy Story 3 did. But the Cars sequels and Toy Story 4 represent too big of a worry. Apparently, Pixar isn’t allowed any missteps. We’ve already seen this with Brave, Monsters University, and more recently, The Good Dinosaur. Those are films that I love dearly. While Finding Dory should remind everyone that Pixar is still in robust shape, creating a sequel that retains the emotional power of its predecessor, that still isn’t enough for most.

But why is Finding Dory so significant, even if it is a dreaded sequel? For starters, it’s only the third Pixar film to feature a female protagonist. A supporting female character with a murky background became much more substantial. Dory was hilarious and heartbreaking in the first film. She still is, but now she’s achieved closure. Her story was given so much love and attention that the sequel, in retrospect, is all the more necessary. And sequels are rarely ever necessary according to the general public.

Then of course, is what her short term memory loss represents. It’s not merely there for laughs.

“I was using her disability to represent everybody. It works for anybody, because nobody is perfect. Everybody has a flaw that they maybe mislabel as such.”

-Andrew Stanton

Her disability doesn’t hinder her from being kind, generous, and friendly. It doesn’t hinder her from demonstrating empathy or discovering other forms of strength. And probably less important, or maybe even more so, is that Marlin and Nemo, along with new friends Hank, Destiny, and Bailey, do not pity Dory. They recognize all the wonderful things she is capable of, not despite her disability, but precisely because of it. They see her, first and foremost, as a friend they love and care about. She recognizes the same and encourages them despite their own limitations. This is a sequel where the characters either overcome their disabilities or still thrive even if they aren’t cured of them. That kind of message is vital for all ages, but especially for the youngest who do make up a large portion of Pixar’s audience.

tumblr_mjzmteGdWm1s714eko1_500When Stanton first revealed how Dory’s disability would be treated (in this excellent interview with Collider), I was reminded of “Toy Story of TERROR!” That short film, like Finding Dory, made a vivacious supporting female character the lead. Jessie’s role in Toy Story 2 functions the same way as Dory’s in Finding Nemo. She adds more emotional weight. In “TERROR!”, Jessie overcomes her claustrophobia in order to save the day. Many fans even praised the sensitive way her panic attacks and anxiety were depicted.

“Jessie never gives up, Jessie finds a way.”

Compare that to Dory’s unflagging optimism in Finding Nemo, along with her insistence that there’s always another way in the sequel. These are two female characters who confront or embrace their weaknesses and disabilities. They refuse to give up even when they’ve seemingly exhausted all their options.

Jessie and Dory assist the male hero but they are well rounded supporting characters in their own right. Jessie was introduced in a sequel while Dory was re-introduced in one of her own. Holly Shiftwell in Cars 2 was Mater’s romantic interest, but she was also a highly skilled secret agent. Whether The Incredibles 2 features any prominent new female characters remains to be seen. Could Helen and/or Violet be protagonists this time around? They’re still compelling even as secondary characters. Cruz Ramirez in Cars 3 is a crucial character, but she’s supporting Lightning McQueen. No doubt she’ll be fun to watch and we should hope for a positive, non stereotypical representation of her Hispanic background.

tumblr_mzxuikdFDd1s5wuldo1_500Now onto Toy Story 4. Woody will be reunited with Bo Peep in a love story. Bo Peep is really the only female character in a Pixar film who is merely peripheral. She had less screentime in Toy Story 2 because, as a porcelain lamp, it wasn’t logical that she’d be able to travel with the other toys around the tri-county area. Her absence in the third film was also a logical choice for the story. It was meant to show that losing friends is inevitable, but also made sense because Molly wouldn’t have assigned Bo Peep any sentimental value and held onto her like Andy did with his toys.

Bo Peep isn’t a dynamic character, but that’s not an issue. She may be on the sidelines, but so are Slinky, Rex, Hamm, and Mr. Potato Head. They’re all colorful, interesting characters, but the motivations and character arcs are reserved for Woody and Buzz.

We don’t know what to expect from Toy Story 4 just yet, but given Pixar’s track record, I think it’s safe to assume that Bo Peep will be an even stronger character in this upcoming installment.

For those who scoff at sequels and Pixar’s recent proliferation of them, their future does appear bleak. It’s much easier to look at Cars 2, Monsters University, Cars 3, and Toy Story 4 as proof positive of Pixar’s decline than to look past those films and remain eager about what else is yet to come. What’s ironic is that no one harbors this kind of pessimism for The Incredibles 2. Doesn’t that film have just as much potential as the others to be unspectacular? The general consensus of course is that The Incredibles 2 is the only sequel capable of being good. But Finding Dory and the Toy Story sequels have proven that to be untrue. Even if Cars 2Monsters University, and The Good Dinosaur are regarded as weak efforts, that still doesn’t mean that Pixar’s creative quality has declined.

I prefer to take an optimistic view of Pixar’s sequels because of the roles Pixar heroines, old and new, get to play. Despite popular beliefs to the contrary, I know there are more original films in the works. Coco is just the only one that’s been announced.

Good stories exist in Pixar’s original films and their sequels. Personally, I have yet to watch a bad Pixar film. Others don’t agree and that’s fine too. I’m not worried about Pixar making a bad film, because as I’ve seen, they’re still making good ones.

Pessimism is tempting, but as Dory says, there’s always another way.

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Second ‘Party Central’ Clip and Poster Released

Monsters University, Party Central, Short Film

Posted by Brkyo614 • March 5, 2014

This new clip from Party Central takes things a step further than the last one, showing us just how Oozma Kappa plans to lure partygoers from a rival fraternity into their house.

Arriving along with the clip is a great new Party Central poster, shared by Pixar on their official Tumblr. (Be sure to click the thumbnail to enjoy the very detailed high-res version.) This seems to be shaping up quite well; look for it in front of Muppets Most Wanted on March 21.

Your thoughts?

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‘Party Central’ Clip Sets Up the Premise

Monsters University, Party Central, Short Film

Posted by Brkyo614 • February 10, 2014

It won’t be long until Party Central hits theaters, but if you’re itching for a peek at the Monsters University-based short, Moviefone has a brand new clip (embedded here via Disney UK):

This is just the tip of the iceberg of what’s to come as Mike and Sulley breathe some life into Oozma Kappa’s celebration. Moviefone also shared a new interview with director Kelsey Mann, who notes that Monsters Inc.‘s Muppets-inspired character designs make the short a good fit to play alongside Muppets Most Wanted.

Do you plan on checking out the short next month?

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‘Monsters University’ & ‘Toy Story of Terror’ Earn Annie Nominations [UPDATE: Winners Announced]

Annie Awards, Awards, Monsters University, Toy Story of Terror!

Posted by Brkyo614 • February 2, 2014

It’s that time of the year again. The International Animated Film Society has just announced the nominees for the 41st annual Annie Awards – the first of many award shows to come. Monsters University and Disney’s Frozen led the pack with ten nominations; both are contenders for Best Animated Feature alongside A Letter to Momo, Despicable Me 2, Ernest & Celestine, The Croods, and The Wind Rises. Monsters U also received nominations in the following categories:

  • Animated Effects in an Animated Production (Joshua Jenny, Jason Johnston, Matthew Wong, Eric Froemling, Enrique Vila)
  • Character Animation in a Feature Production (John Chun Chiu Lee)
  • Character Design in an Animated Feature Production (Chris Sasaki)
  • Music in an Animated Feature Production (Randy Newman)
  • Production Design in an Animated Feature Production (Ricky Nierva, Robert Kondo, Daisuke "Dice" Tsutsumi)
  • Storyboarding in an Animated Feature Production (Dean Kelly)
  • Voice Acting in an Animated Feature Production (Billy Crystal as Mike)
  • Writing in an Animated Feature Production (Daniel Gerson, Robert L. Baird, Dan Scanlon)
  • Editorial in an Animated Feature Production (Greg Snyder, Gregory Amundson, Steve Bloom)

Toy Story of Terror also garnered quite a bit of attention, earning seven nominations among five categories:

  • Best Animated Special Production
  • Character Animation in an Animated Television/Broadcast Production (3 individual nominations: JC Tran Quang Thieu, David DeVan, and Kureha Yokoo)
  • Directing in an Animated TV/Broadcast Production (Angus MacLane)
  • Storyboarding in an Animated TV/Broadcast Production (Daniel Chong)
  • Editorial in an Animated TV/Broadcast Production (Axel Geddes, Kathy Graves, Chloe Kloezeman)

For a complete list of nominees, head over to the Annie Awards website. Check back on February 1, 2014 for the winners.

UPDATE: The winners have been revealed. Pixarians took home a total of five awards; three for Toy Story of Terror and two for Monsters University. Those were:

  • Storyboarding in an Animated Feature Production (Dean Kelly, Monsters University)
  • Editorial in an Animated Feature Production (Greg Snyder, Gregory Amundson, Steve Bloom, Monsters University)
  • Character Animation in an Animated Television/Broadcast Production (Kureha Yokoo, Toy Story of Terror)
  • Directing in an Animated TV/Broadcast Production (Angus MacLane, Toy Story of Terror)
  • Storyboarding in an Animated TV/Broadcast Production (Daniel Chong, Toy Story of Terror)

Congratulations to all of the winners!

 

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Pixar Snubbed at the 86th Academy Awards

Academy Awards, Monsters University, The Blue Umbrella

Posted by Brkyo614 • January 16, 2014

The Oscars have been kind to Pixar over the years – with the exception of Cars 2, all of the studio’s features have been nominated for Best Animated Feature Film since the creation of the category in 2001. As a result, it came as a huge shock when Monsters University went unmentioned during this morning’s 2014 nomination announcements. Instead, these five films were chosen for the Best Animated category:

  • The Croods
  • Despicable Me 2
  • Ernest & Celestine
  • Frozen
  • The Wind Rises

The Blue Umbrella wasn’t nominated, either; in fact, it didn’t even make the shortlist for Best Animated Short Film. The five in that category were:

  • Feral
  • Get a Horse!
  • Mr. Hublot
  • Possessions
  • Room on the Broom

Monsters U was also absent at the Golden Globes, but the Oscars’ five animated film slots made a nomination seem like a safe bet. The film was mostly well-received by critics, so the omission seems to partially be a response to the backlash when Brave took home last year’s award above strong competition. Although Frozen and The Wind Rises are clear contenders to win this time around, the lack of even a nomination for MU is puzzling.

Still, the film has earned some love elsewhere, most notably from the Annies, BAFTAs, and VES Awards. Pixarians took the miss well; director Dan Scanlon tweeted a particularly eloquent response. Ultimately, it’s oddly appropriate that Monsters University, with its messages of moving on from failure and finding new opportunities, didn’t make the cut.

For the full list of nominees, head over to the official Oscars website.

What do you think? Was Monsters University worthy of a nomination?

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New ‘Monsters University’ Short Will Play Before ‘Muppets Most Wanted’

Monsters University, Party Central, Short Film

Posted by Brkyo614 • January 7, 2014

One of the many announcements from last year’s D23 Expo was the reveal of Party Central, a short set in the Monsters University world. It was slated to be attached to The Good Dinosaur, but that film’s delay to 2015 brought its fate into question. Thanks to Entertainment Weekly, we now know that we won’t have to wait long to see Party Central; it’ll be attached to the upcoming Muppets Most Wanted.

The short was already complete when it was screened at D23, so it makes sense for Pixar to get it out this year – and the choice of film is unsurprising, as the Toy Story Toon Small Fry was attached to the first Muppets reboot. Director Kelsey Mann, who was a story supervisor on Monsters University, spoke with EW about the roots of Party Central:

"When you first meet the Oozma Kappas, they go to their fraternity house and the first thing they say is, ‘Welcome to party central! We haven’t thrown a party yet, but when we do we’ll be ready. I kept telling [
MU director] Dan [Scanlon], ‘I really want to see their party. We have to do it in the credits or something.’ Then when the idea of doing a short came up, we were like, ‘That could be the party!’"

Pixar won’t be putting out a feature film this year, but perhaps Party Central will make the wait for 2015 a bit less excruciating. Muppets Most Wanted releases in the U.S. on March 21.

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Woody’s News Round-Up! (11/15/13)

Awards, Behind The Scenes, Blu-Ray, Ed Catmull, Monsters University, Round-Ups, The Blue Umbrella

Posted by Brkyo614 • November 15, 2013

Now that Toy Story of Terror and the Monsters University DVD are out, it could be a while before we hear any major news on the Pixar front. Still, here are a few updates that have popped up over the last week:

Complete Pixar Blu-ray Collection: If you’ve yet to upgrade your Pixar DVD collection to Blu-ray, now is the perfect chance with this 22-disc collection that includes every Pixar feature and short to date (with the exception of Toy Story of Terror, Small Fry, and Partysaurus Rex). The one caveat: it’s only available in the UK on region B discs. If you’re still on board, order the collection now on Amazon.

Disney Releases Monsters University and The Blue Umbrella Screenplays: Each year, Disney showcases their films for award consideration on the Walt Disney Studios Awards website. Though not yet fully fleshed out, the site has been updated for 2013 with pages for Monsters University and The Blue Umbrella. Most notably, it also features screenplays for both films; check them out here and here. (The Blue Umbrella is a particularly interesting read.)

The Making of The Blue Umbrella: If that screenplay piqued your interest, Indiewire has a feature exploring the earliest steps in the creation of The Blue Umbrella, including some fascinating live-action test footage. Be sure to take a look! (via Pixar Post)

Ed Catmull Details His Experience with Pixar in Upcoming Book: There have been a handful of books detailing Pixar’s rich history over the years – The Pixar Touch and To Infinity and Beyond! come to mind – but we’ve yet to see a substantial firsthand account of the studio’s rise. Now, Pixar founder Ed Catmull is set to collaborate with Amy Wallace on a new book on his time at Pixar: Creativity, Inc. Releasing next April, the book will “provide an inside account of Pixar’s rise from a small, money-losing hardware company to a movie studio with 1,200 employees and a streak of fourteen No. 1 movies in a row that has garnered 30 Academy Awards and earned more than $7 billion worldwide.” Pre-orders are already available on Amazon.

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‘Monsters University,’ ‘Cars’ 3D Arrive on Blu-ray/DVD

Blu-Ray, Cars, DVD, Monsters University

Posted by Brkyo614 • October 29, 2013

After an early digital release, Monsters University has finally made its way to DVD and Blu-ray today. Blu-ray.com and High Def Digest both praise the audio/video quality and the abundance of extras included with the film. It’s worth noting that, like most recent Pixar releases, the DVD version is sorely lacking in special features; pick up any of the three Blu-ray editions, though, and you’ll be good to go.

Fans of Cars may also be interested in the 3D Blu-ray release of the original film, also hitting shelves today. This is the first time Cars has been released in 3D — High Def Digest has great things to say about the conversion, but points out some inherent issues that come with converting a 2D film into 3D. The same bonus features from the existing Blu-ray are also included.

Be sure to let us know if you pick up either of these releases!

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‘Monsters University’ Now Available for Digital Download

Blu-Ray, DVD, iTunes Store, Monsters University

Posted by Brkyo614 • October 8, 2013

Disney has recently experimented with home release schedules for its major titles — last year’s Wreck-it Ralph, for instance, launched digitally weeks before physical copies hit shelves. Monsters University is the latest movie to follow suit; Amazon and iTunes now have the film up for download in HD ahead of its October 29 Blu-ray release.

Fans will be happy to hear that the digital version includes most of the extras set to come with the traditional release later this month. Those looking for a standard-definition download will still have to wait until the 29th.

Download the film at iTunes or Amazon, or pre-order the Blu-ray or DVD edition today.

Are you catching Monsters U for the first time? Let us know below!

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