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10 Years Later Up’s Opening Sequence Still Packs An Emotional Punch

Anniversary, UP

Posted by Nia • May 20, 2019

It feels like it was only yesterday that Up premiered in cinemas and we fell in love with some of Pixar’s most iconic characters: Carl and Ellie Fredricksen, Russell, Dug, and of course, Kevin. It’s unfathomable to think it’s been 10 years since we all laughed, cried, and went on one of the biggest adventures of our lives as we followed Carl on his epic quest to reach Paradise Falls.

There are obviously a lot of amazing things about Up that still hold the test of time: the breathtaking reveal of Carl’s balloon house as it soars out of the city for the first time; the sweet depiction of Dug and his adoration for his humans; even the delicious villainy of Charles F. Muntz. But the greatest part about Up, and one of the finest moments in animation history, is the opening sequence, otherwise known as Married Life.

What makes the sequence so special is the fact that Up’s director, Pete Docter, decided to tell the story of Carl and Ellie’s relationship without dialogue. I’ve always been a firm believer that you don’t need dialogue to tell a story – so much can be achieved with a subtle glance or the character’s body language, how they carry themselves across the screen or interact with the world around them, that 10+ pages of dialogue can never achieve.

The Married Life opening depicts the entirety of the couple’s relationship without words but through images of their life together, little snippets of the good and the bad parts of any relationship – starting from Carl and Ellie’s wedding and ending with Ellie’s funeral. Their relationship could’ve spanned at least half of the film, there’s even a feature length film in there somewhere about the duo, but it was told brilliantly in less than five minutes. We didn’t need dialogue to tell us that Carl and Ellie were in love and what they went through in the course of their time together. Instead, with the clever way the talented folks at Pixar animated the sequence, we saw their love for each other in the brief glimpses of their relationship as they built their dream home and worked at the zoo. We saw their hopes about the future and their goals of traveling to South America and starting a family. We saw how they were able to overcome adult problems like home-owning and having a flat tire, and we even saw their struggles with infertility and how that affected them both in different ways.

Another reason why Married Life works so well is because of Michael Giacchino’s heartbreaking score; the sequence simply wouldn’t be the same without it. If you closed your eyes while listening to Giacchino’s Married Life theme, you could almost picture the story, scene by scene, in your head. The melodies that follow Carl and Ellie on their journey together are simple and just as unique as the old-fashioned couple; the score perfectly follows the ups and downs of their relationship, giving us some lighthearted and catchy tunes while also pulling at our heartstrings at the more somber moments. Michael Giacchino even went on to win the Academy Award for Best Original Score for his work on Up at the 82nd Academy Awards.

I have no doubt in another 10, 20, or even 30 years, the Married Life sequence in Up will still break our hearts and fill us with as much joy and devastation as it did the very first time we watched it. The opening sequence is a testament to the brilliance of animation and that with this art form, there are SO many ways to tell a story; not everything has to involve dialogue or spelling it out for the audience.

So, happy 10 Year Anniversary, Up! And congratulations again to all the amazing and incredibly talented people who worked on the project many moons ago. Adventure is out there! 

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The Cast Of Up 10 Years On – Where Are They Now?

Anniversary, UP

Posted by Joanna • May 15, 2019

Unbelievably, Up turns 10 years old at the end of the month. There’s nothing like one of your favourite movies reaching a monumental birthday to make you despair over the relentless passage of time. 10 years is a long time. Pete Docter, the director of Up, has since become the chief creative officer at Pixar, which just goes to show you how much a person can grow over the course of a decade.

This got us thinking: where would Carl, Russell, and the crew be 10 years after the events of Up? Obviously there’s not just one answer to this, so let’s explore the different possibilities for each character.

Carl

First of all, let’s get this out of the way: NO. CARL IS NOT DEAD. That option is not going to be considered. Carl Fredricksen is currently still enjoying the adventure of his life and you can’t convince me otherwise. During the main events of Up, Carl is 78, so now he’ll be at the grand age of 88. Charles Muntz was 92 and still a fully-functioning owner of a blimp full of talking dogs. Who knows what Carl could still be capable of?

We can see from the stills during the end credits that Carl fully embraces his new role as Dug’s master. I think because he understands so deeply the loneliness that elderly people can experience, Carl would find a lot of happiness in training up Dug’s pups to become loving companions to those in need.

Carl and Russell are no doubt looking forward to the next Star Wars movie too, and hopefully they’re enjoying all the spin-offs.

Russell

Russell was a sweet 9 year old Wilderness Explorer, so now he’ll be 19! I can imagine Russell still getting a lot of enjoyment from learning about the huge diversity of animals on the planet (“There are no tigers in South America. Zoology.”), and he’ll definitely want to explore the world one day. Finally earning his ‘Assisting the Elderly’ badge (and, of course, the Ellie badge), might have put things into perspective for him a little though. Maybe Russell is making the most of his time with Carl, maybe he’s volunteering in a care home, or maybe he’s become a Wilderness Explorer Leader, training up a whole new generation of helpful wildlife enthusiasts.

Whatever he’s up to now, he’ll be doing it out of kindness and curiosity because, wow, he’s a good kid.

Dug

Let’s assume Dug was a young dog during the events of Up, because no one likes to think about dogs not being alive any more. A decade later, Dug is probably enjoying a slower pace of life alongside his master, Carl (and possibly alongside some of his puppies). Hopefully that talking collar is still functioning! Dug had a hard start in life, so what he really deserves is a great long life just doing what normal dogs do: lounging in the garden, chasing squirrels, begging for food, and insisting on sleeping on the double bed at night.

Kevin

Kevin, as ever, is a mystery. Who knows how long the mythical ‘Snipe’ lives? Bird can live for a pretty long time (ostriches can live up to 45 years), so let’s all agree that Kevin is alive and well and raising her 15th brood of chicks. The tropical ‘Snipe’ population in Paradise Falls will have had a boost through conservation efforts sparked by Carl and Russell’s awareness campaigns. Maybe Kevin still thinks about her human friends sometimes, or maybe she just misses chocolate.

 

Up did an amazing job of showing that all of life’s ventures are adventures in themselves. Yes, perhaps on paper – or on screen – Carl and Russell’s trip to Paradise Falls was the most exciting event of their lives, but I’m sure that experience has taught them that every memory is of value. It’s 10 years later, and their adventure has only continued.

Ellie would be proud! And I can imagine their house still sitting right beside Paradise Falls, slowly returning to nature with plants growing over the windows and birds nesting in the chimney. I don’t think Ellie would want it any other way.

 

This is just one post out of a series to celebrate Up‘s 1oth anniversary. We’d love to hear your memories and thoughts – leave us a comment, or tweet us and use #Up10th! Where do you see the cast of Up now?

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Pixar at the Oscars

Academy Awards, Animation, Inside Out, Interview, John Lasseter, Jonas Rivera, Lava, Michael Giacchino, Pete Docter, Pixar, Sanjay's Super Team, Short Film, The Good Dinosaur, UP

Posted by Nia • January 16, 2016

Congratulations to the talented folks at Pixar for receiving not one but THREE Oscar nominations during Thursday’s announcement. Inside Out was nominated for Best Animated Feature Film and also scored a nomination for Best Original Screenplay; it will be the only animated film competing in that category. Sanjay’s Super Team took home a nod for Best Animated Short Film.

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"Sanjay's Super Team" Comes to the Con ? Director Sanjay Patel and producer Nicole Grindle are taking Pixar Animation Studios' new short to San Diego's Comic-Con International next month for its North American premiere and a peek behind the scenes of the production process. The Super Story Behind the Pixar Short "Sanjay's Super Team," slated for Thurs., July 9 at 11 a.m. in the Indigo Ballroom, Hilton Bayfront, reveals the unique inspiration for this incredibly personal film that features superheroes like never before. The short debuts in U.S. theaters in front of Disney-Pixar's "The Good Dinosaur" on Nov. 25, 2015.

Via Disney/Pixar

It was indeed great news hearing that Pixar was nominated for several awards, but it’s also hard not to acknowledge the slight disappointments regarding snubs to both The Good Dinosaur and Lava. In an ideal world, all four films released from the studio would have been nominated for Oscars. They all followed the Pixar standard of challenging both art and technology, paving the way for future animated films. The Good Dinosaur alone was revolutionary in it’s technical aspects and successful blend of animation against hyperrealistic backgrounds. Lava also showcased stunning backgrounds that were brought to life through the use of song; depicting the romance between two volcanoes without dialogue but only through a love ballad. Lava‘s catchy song was clearly absent from the Best Original Song nominees. Also missing from the Best Original Score category was Michael Giacchino’s beautiful work on Inside Out.

In the past, an animated film has even been nominated for Best Picture, such as Pete Docter’s last film Up. If an animated film can be nominated for Best Picture, then it’s director should also be recognized in the Best Director category. Inside Out was incredibly inventive and something we haven’t seen before. It cleverly took us inside the mind of a young girl and created relatable characters out of her emotions… not to mention simultaneously hitting us all with a wave of childhood nostalgia. Docter spent 4+ years working on the film; from writing the screenplay, approving every minute detail most audience members might miss, to even guiding a brilliant team of artists into crafting his vision. That time frame is longer than most live action directors work on a film.

In an interview with Screencrush, Pixarian Kelsey Mann explains why animation directors are just as worthy as notable live action directors in receiving acknowledgement from The Academy:

“From the ground up, directors at Pixar are in charge of everything from the story to the individual blades of grass. We start from nothing. Literally nothing. And it all has to be built from the ground up. And Pete is involved in every decision.”

Slowly audiences (and even The Academy) are beginning to realize that animation isn’t only for children, but it’s an art form entirely of it’s own; crafting stories a thousand times better and more original than most of the live action films released in Hollywood. Here’s hoping that one day an animated film will not only be nominated for Best Picture again, but will win it too.

We will definitely be keeping our fingers crossed for Pixar to take home all of the awards on the February 28th Oscar ceremony.

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Interview: David Tanaka on ‘Pixar in Concert’!

Cars 2, Finding Nemo, Interview, Monsters, Inc., OpenSubDiv, Pete Docter, Pixar, Randy Newman, Ratatouille, Soundtrack, The Incredibles, Toy Story, UP, WALL-E

Posted by Brkyo614 • August 4, 2012

Note: This Q&A was conducted by contributor Leo Holzer.

_____

The following is an email interview I had with David Tanaka, the Creative Editor of Pixar in Concert. I’d like to thank Tanaka for his detailed answers and Chris Wiggum at Pixar for arranging the interview.

Q: Please tell me about the process. What prompted the Pixar in Concert idea? How easy was it to get everyone on board and how long did it take from idea to this past weekend’s event?
Tanaka: The entire process for Pixar in Concert actually took around two-plus years, starting in 2010. Show produces Brice Parker and Laurel Ladevich and myself were in constant communication with Pete Docter, Jonas Rivera, and John Lasseter over that period of time, as we sharpened the conceptual approach to the concert, reached out to all the Pixar directors, producers, and music composers, and refined the evolving edited musical suites for each of the Pixar movies to be featured in the performance.

It really all started with a simple, "What if we did a concert on the music of Pixar?" from Brice Parker to Pete Docter. Pete, whose mother is a music instructor and has a strong musical background himself, loved the idea. Based on his interest in the proposal, I started editing a few "sample cuts" on some of the Pixar films in accordance with the base idea. I believe the first few edits included UP, Finding Nemo and the first two Toy Story movies.

After review with Pete and Jonas Rivera, the results were then shown to Disney Music Publishing’s Chris Montan and Tom MacDougall. They in turn embraced the idea and encouraged us to continue to pursue the project.

A few edited iterations and additions later and we had a formal presentation to show to John Lasseter in one of Pixar’s screening review rooms. John also loved the idea and agreed that the concert should really be only about the music – no dialogue at all from the Pixar movies to interrupt the audience’s pleasure listening to the musical scores, very limited sound effects only to enhance the point of the music if need be, and imagery directly from the movies themselves with no additional "bonus material" such as behind-the-scenes conceptual artwork or crew photos.

This would instead be "all about the music", as it relates to what the audiences members themselves experienced when they first enjoyed the Pixar movies through the years.

With this set of parameters understood and agreed upon, a constant stream of editing was produced and sent to Pete and John as our creative executives over the coming months. Given both individuals’ busy schedules and other company commitments, this often resulted in a lot of QuickTime movie files generated and many "iPad" reviews. They in turn would give Brice Parker, Laurel Ladevich and myself cut content feedback via email or voicemail, with occasional formal review get-togethers wherever possible.

We would also arrange for individuals such as music composer Michael Giacchino to stop by my Avid Media Composer edit suite from time to time to review certain cuts (specifically The Incredibles, Ratatouille and Up in Michael’s case). Michael in particular was very gracious with his time, offering great suggestions not only with musical selections, but also pointers on how, for example, to rhythmically transition from low melodies to extremely fast-paced scores and vice-versa in certain cases.

Q: What was your role as creative editor?
Tanaka: My role as Creative Editor entailed performing all edits for the entire set of Pixar musical concert suites, from the first rough-cut conceptual passes to final online polishing. The process involved collaborating with all of the Pixar directors, producers, and music composers to ensure that my personal selection of music and related animated imagery jibed with their expectations for each of the 13 Pixar animated features to date.

Q: Tell me more about the selection and order of clips to support the underlying music.
Tanaka: I was pretty much left to my own accord regarding how to initially approach musical selection and accompanying Pixar picture content. With the amount of creative control I was given, I thought it best to approach the editing process by simply asking myself as a moviegoer, "What are my fondest memories from each of the Pixar movies?" For that reason picture and music were often cut together, directly from each Pixar movie as they were synced for original feature film release, as a starting point.

(But) we had two major challenges throughout the editorial process regarding edited content:

1 – Core Narrative Theme Per Film: Since this concert project is to celebrate the music of Pixar, we don’t necessarily want to re-tell the entire story of each movie, from start to finish, in some kind of condensed cut version. We knew we could pretty much assume that persons paying for tickets to experience this concert had seen most of the Pixar movies, if not all of them. Therefore, from an editorial standpoint, the challenge became how to craft one’s favorite moments from the films into some central narrative core theme or message per movie.

In the case of Ratatouille, for example, it was Remy’s "joy of cooking" over, say, Linguini’s romance story with Collette or his butting heads with Sous Chef Skinner. For Finding Nemo, it was the father/son relationship between Marlin and Nemo despite how entertaining the banter between Marlin and Dory was to watch. For Up, it was — no question — all about Carl Fredricksen’s love for his best friend and wife, Ellie, despite his newfound relationships with Russell, Kevin the bird and talking dog, Dug, in the movie.

In making these clear cut decisions to focus on specific narrative themes, it helped shape the direction of my edits further away from just being "best of" or "highlights" montage reels.

Adhering to this approach of conveying narrative themes as best as possible, however, sometimes meant breaking with the actual chronological unfolding of events as originally presented in the movies.

For Monsters, Inc., for example, to tell the story of Sully’s caring for Boo we needed to first explain how the factory "scare floor" actually worked, with its access to children’s multiple bedrooms. To show how sad it was for Sully to leave Boo behind before he reopens her bedroom door at the end of the movie, however, I decided to introduce the characters’ sad parting scene in "flashback", right before Sully opens the door. Such an arrangement deviated from the feature film, but gave the best emotional payoff possible for the concert audience while at the same time complementing Randy Newman’s underlying score.

Another example is WALL-E in which it was decided early on that we would focus on the romance between the little trash compacting robot and E.V.E, as opposed to the story of "humans in space". Such scenes struck an emotional chord with moviegoers and also offered some of the most beautiful scores Thomas Newman created for the film. In order to center on the romance theme, however, we felt we needed to remind audiences of WALL-E’s personality first – his humor and sense of awe. Again breaking from original feature film release narrative order, I decided to first showcase scenes in which WALL-E comically sifts through trash in his "day job", as well as when he takes in the wonders of the universe upon leaving Earth. Although WALL-E first meets E.V.E. before leaving his home planet, presenting concert audiences with his tour of the universe first made for a better understanding as to why WALL-E is so awe-inspired by E.V.E.‘s ability to fly (when she was introduced on Earth) and how easy it was to immediately fall in love with her.

2 – Concert Performance Time Constraints: The other challenge to editing this concert was purely logistical: time. Working closely with San Francisco’s Davies Symphony Hall, we determined that a concert event of this type should run approximately 90 minutes in total length, with a 20-minute intermission included. With 13 Pixar feature animated motion pictures to account for, that roughly determined that each of my edited suites should run for as short as four minutes to as long as seven or eight minutes, but no longer. Given the adherence to highlighting particular narrative themes per movie and the ability to shift scenes out of sequence, I could cut in accordance to such time constraints, and as a whole deliver edited concert material within the requested 70-minute total running time.

In the final stages of production, my job as Creative Editor also entailed final video projection quality checks with Brice Parker and Laurel Ladevich prior to the actual live performances at San Francisco’s Davies Symphony Hall, connecting with Disney Music Publishing’s team of Johnathan Heely and Ed Kainins to go over technical concerns regarding smooth video projection playback rates and cross-comparing conductor versus audience synced video footage, and also communicating with Music Arranger, Mark Watters, regarding any last (minute) questions or suggestions during rehearsals with Conductor Sarah Hicks and the Davies Symphony Orchestra.

Q: I found it interesting that the music wasn’t shown in chronological order starting with Toy Story and ending with Brave. Knowing Pixar, I knew there was some thought given to the program arrangement. Can you tell me more about the decision-making?
Tanaka: It was such an interesting selection process to go through regarding concert program arrangement, for we definitely had several key points of criteria to consider. Right from the start, however, the one fact we knew didn’t make any sense to adhere to was the chronological order in which the Pixar movies were originally released. "So what," right? As personal fans of cinema ourselves, our love of movies really has no bearing on compartmentalizing feature films to what specific year they were shown to the public for the very first time. (We just love them!)

Bryond starting the concert with Pixar’s first film Toy Story as sort of an homage to "the little film company that could", the program arrangement of the other movies came down to other factors. Those factors included:

  • who the Pixar director and music composer were for each production
  • if that particular production was a Pixar sequel
  • and, the resulting overall tone of the piece I ended up editing to represent each movie.

We really felt that the specific movies per each of our five Pixar directors (Andrews, Bird, Docter, Lasseter, and Stanton) should be equally spread across the program as opposed to being clumped together since there may be aesthetic similarities if we group one filmmaker’s body of work one after another. Why not instead spread them out?

Similarly, we felt that our four Pixar music composers (Doyle, Giacchino, R. Newman and T. Newman) should also be separated across the entire concert so their composing styles could be best appreciated played in contrast to one another, as opposed to being performed one after another.

In addition, it only made sense that Pixar sequels (such as sequels for the Toy Story and Cars sagas) should be separated from one another in the program so they could be appreciated on their own merits, and not unfairly condensed down as if to imply that they together represent just one story and individually nothing more.

Lastly,, the final edited suite I created for each Pixar movie was then assessed for content and the resulting overall tone that was created. For example, The Incredibles and Cars 2  suites I cut really celebrated the action adventure spirit contained in each of those films, therefore they should perhaps not be placed next to each other in order to give the audience variety spread across the entire concert.

On the other end of the spectrum, Finding Nemo and Up evolved into offering two of our most dramatic and emotional suites for the evening, therefore they should intentionally be set apart from each other for optimum audience appreciation.

David Tanaka then volunteered some "closing thoughts":

As mentioned, the entire process lasted for (more than) two years, with much collaboration and back and forth communication from all involved. It was truly a fun process for myself and everyone involved, all in the name of our love of musical scores.

In addition to the satisfaction of representing our Pixar movies, directors, music composers and movie soundtracks as best as possible, having audience members experience and enjoy Pixar’s 13 movies through music and just in the span of a mere 90-minute concert performance was an extremely rewarding experience for me as the project’s Creative Editor, and hopefully for the audience as well!

——-

Have you experienced Pixar in Concert?

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Pixar Classics to be Re-Released in AMC Theatres!

Ratatouille, Toy Story 3, UP, WALL-E

Posted by Brkyo614 • May 18, 2012

Seeing a Pixar film theatrically has always been a special experience. It’s been difficult to relive these films again on the big screen, but re-releases such as the Toy Story double feature and the upcoming 3D versions of Monsters, Inc. and Finding Nemo have helped alleviate this problem. Now AMC Theatres is offering the chance to once again enjoy a line-up of recent Pixar hits the way they were meant to be seen!

Ratatouille, WALL-E, Up, and Toy Story 3 will screened at select AMC Theatres in a limited engagement from May 25 to May 28, 2012. Toy Story 3 and Up are set to be shown in 3D, making this the first chance to catch the 3D version of Up since its 2009 release. Each screening will also be accompanied by an exclusive behind-the-scenes look at Brave.

Tickets are priced at a discounted $6, ideal for families and anyone hoping to hold a movie marathon. To see if your local theatre is participating and order tickets, head over to the AMC website here.

Do you plan to re-experience Pixar’s slate of classics next weekend?

Correction: Contrary to listings on the AMC Theatres website, Toy Story 3 and Up will not be screened in 3D.

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Up Open House!

UP

Posted by rachelcakes1985 • August 12, 2011

Do you have a spare US $400,000? Then perhaps you could make time to float on over to the auction of an actual, live-able, Up house!

Carl Frederickson wouldn’t look too out of place sitting on the porch of this home. From the mural in the living room and the weather vane on the roof, to the "Carl and Ellie" hand-stamped letterbox, this cosy creation is impressive in both ambition and attention to detail. It simply couldn’t look any more similar to the skyward-bound house featured in Pixar’s 2009 film.

Built by Bangerter Homes, the two-story house was given the tick of approval by Disney, with the finishing touches still being added at this current stage. For the rooms that were not shown in the film, such as the bathroom, the creators aimed to give the house that distinctive Up feel, from both the film style and era that it was set in, while still being functional for the present day.

Located at 13216 S Herriman Rose Blvd (5400 W) in Herriman, Utah, the project will be featured at the 2011 Annual Salt Lake Home Builders Association’s parade, being house number 14 in the event. The house is open for viewing from 29th July until 14th August and is open daily from 11am – 9pm, for those who have a parade ticket. Since tickets are now sold out online, fans can purchase them in person at the venues shown on this map.

You may also watch an interview with the creator of the home, as well as see more of the house, over at the KSL.com.

Are you going to make your way to the house to see it up close? Share your thoughts on the project in the comments, or discuss it with other fans at the Pixar Planet forums.

Editor’s Note: Written by Upcoming Pixar contributor Rachelcakes1985, this article is part of a new, lighter series to be published several times a month. Rachel will cover stories such as the above from time to time. Rachel has previously contributed to the Upcoming Pixar blog and is a dedicated poster on the Pixar Planet forums.

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P.U.: The Simpsons Does Pixar… Again!

UP

Posted by Martin • October 4, 2010

It’s clear that the folks behind The Simpsons are huge Pixar fans. In the past, they’ve put their own spin on favorites such as WALL•E and Finding Nemo.

This next clip is the most recent and elaborate Pixar parody the show has ever done. In fact, it includes quite a few references to the studio’s characters. They’ve called it P.U.: a parody of Up’s Married Life sequence starring the infamous cartoon duo, Itchy and Scratchy:

You can catch yesterday’s full episode, Loan-a-Lisa, right now on Hulu. International viewers, please note that Hulu may be locked in your region.

Are you a fan of The Simpsons; the Pixar references on the show?

(via Collider)

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Woody’s News Round-Up! (06/12/10)

Round-Ups, Toy Story 3, UP

Posted by Martin • June 12, 2010

Everywhere you look, you’re bound to see Toy Story 3. Here at Upcoming Pixar, we’re committed to condensing it all so that you don’t miss a thing!

NYT Covers TS3 Additions: The New York Times is running a feature on six characters that are new to the Toy Story series. With the help of character designed Bob Pauley, Lotso, Dolly, Ken, Mr. Pricklepants, Big Baby and Stretch are profiled. NYT’s article is accompanied by and interactive feature containing slideshows and sound bites from Pauley.

SF Chronicle on Production Babies + Ratzenberger: The San Francisco Chronicle also features Toy Story 3 in two unique articles today. The first analyzes Pixarian children and their influence on the studio’s films. Pixar’s good luck charm, John Ratzenberger, also talks to the Chronicle about reprising the role of Hamm and his history with the studio.

Coming Soon Talks to Lee/Darla: Toy Story 3’s dynamic duo spoke with Coming Soon about their upcoming film. Lee Unkrich and Darla K. Anderson cover everything from the origins of part three to Pixar’s growth throughout the years.

World Cup + Toy Story: The FIFA World Cup is well under way and the characters from Andy’s room want in on the action. A new Toy Story 3 poster (seen to the right) parodies a famous play in soccer history, Hand of God. Pixar also produced fun little animation featuring soccer’s latest stars, the Little Green Men and Rex. [Thanks, Pixarinho]

Up Takes 7 at Key Art Awards: Mixing things up a bit today. Pixar’s 10th feature, Up, took seven prizes at the Key Art Awards this Friday. The Hollywood Reporter‘s annual ceremony honors film marketing of all kinds. A trailer for Monsters, Inc. on Blu-ray also took home an award. See the full list of winners here. Congrats!

Countdown to Toy Story 3: 6 Days Left!

Your thoughts?

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Apple’s iPhone 4 Takes ‘Up’ Retina!

UP

Posted by Martin • June 7, 2010

Remember the little film that premiered just over a year ago? Yeah, the one that made more than $290 million at the US box-office.

Of course you do and so does Apple! In the midst of anticipation for Toy Story 3, it’s easy to lose sight of the legacy that has led up to Pixar’s 11th feature. But for the new iPhone 4, ‘Up’ is the only way to go!

Today, Pixar’s former CEO, Steve Jobs, unveiled the 2010 model of Apple’s revolutionary mobile phone — officially that is. Among other highly sought after features (such as a front facing camera and multi-tasking) comes the "highest resolution display ever built into a phone": Retina. With such a vibrant screen, Pixar’s iridescent masterpiece, Up, is the obvious choice to showcase the new technology!

In the recently released ad you can catch a glimpse of Carl and Ellie’s story, beautifully displayed on the latest in mobile technology. When iPhone 4 makes its way into stores on June 24th, you too will be able to watch your favorite Pixar films on the go at 940 X 640 pixel resolution.

Note: Earlier this year, iPhone OS 4.0 was revealed to have a new feature called iAd. Pixar also made a cameo here, showcasing the mobile advertising solution with Toy Story 3.

Learn more about iPhone 4 at Apple’s official website.

How cool is it to see Pixar routinely featured on Apple product demos?

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Up Dominates Key Art Awards Nominations!

UP

Posted by Martin • May 10, 2010

With 19 nominations, Up soars above the competition in The Hollywood Reporter’s 39th Annual Key Art Awards!

Pixar’s 10th makes its return to the circuit at the ceremony that honors "creative contributions to the marketing of theatrical motion pictures and DVD releases."

I can’t say I’m surprised by these nods. From the first teaser poster to the film’s For Your Consideration campaign, marketing for Pete Docter’s second outing did nothing but catch people’s eye.

THR notes that Up had the most mentions of any film at these awards. I’ve categorized each nomination below. Click to see the ads.

Theatrical Print: Teaser Posters Rated PG-13 and Below, Standee Display, In-Theater Print, Electronic Print and Animation Posters

Theatrical New Media: Best Website Design, Best Online Banner Advertising and Best Digital Campaign

Theatrical Audio Video: International Audio/Visual, Animation TV Spots (3 nods) and Animation Trailers (2 nods)

Home Entertainment Print: Animation Packaging

Home Entertainment Online Media: Animation Packaging, Video Box Animation (according to THR)

Home Entertainment: Animation TV Spots

Toy Story and Toy Story 2 in 3D Double Feature was also nominated for 3D Print, setting Pixar’s grand total to 20 noms.

Since I’m a huge fan of film marketing, I love that the hard work is getting recognized. It’s also nice to see Carl’s adventure back in the limelight in the midst of all this Toy Story 3 news.

We’ll keep you updated on whether or not Up took home a couple more honors after the June 11th event. Learn more about the Key Art Awards here.

Your thoughts?

(via The Pixar Times)

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