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New Disney/Pixar Gallery Nucleus Exhibition Opens in Los Angeles

30 Years of Pixar, A Bug's Life, Art, Cars, Cars 2, Finding Dory, Finding Nemo, Inside Out, John Lasseter, Monsters University, Monsters, Inc., Ratatouille, The Incredibles, Toy Story, Toy Story 2, Toy Story 3, WALL-E

Posted by Nia • December 10, 2016

Have you ever wanted to see some of your favorite artwork from Pixar films in real life? Fear no more, as a new exhibition has just opened up at Gallery Nucleus in LA today. For the first time ever, the gallery will be showcasing brand new images from each of Pixar’s feature films. What makes it even more unique is that John Lasseter himself picked each design for the show. There will also be hand-signed limited edition prints for sale by each artist who worked on the pieces.

Thanks to Oh My Disney for providing the artwork that will be featured at the showcase.

By Bob Pauley

By Bob Pauley

 

By Tia Kratter

By Tia Kratter

 

By Randy Barret

By Randy Barret

 

By Pete Docter

By Pete Docter

 

By Ralph Eggleston

By Ralph Eggleston

 

By Teddy Newton

By Teddy Newton

 

By Bill Cone

By Bill Cone

 

By Dominique Louis

By Dominique Louis

 

By Ralph Eggleston

By Ralph Eggleston

 

By Lou Romano

By Lou Romano

 

By Robert Kondo

By Robert Kondo

 

By Harley Jessup

By Harley Jessup

 

By Steve Pilch

By Steve Pilch

 

By Rickey Nierva

By Rickey Nierva

 

By Ralph Eggleston

By Ralph Eggleston

 

By Sharon Calahan

By Sharon Calahan

 

By Daniel L Munoz

By Daniel L Munoz

 

Be sure to check out Galley Nucleus and celebrate the art of Pixar if you’re in town – it runs from today, December 10th to January 8th, 2017.

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In depth: Finding Dory, sequels, and Pixar heroines

Cars 2, Cars 3, Finding Dory, in depth, Monsters University, Pixar, Pixar Heroines, sequels, The Incredibles 2, Toy Story 3, Toy Story 4

Posted by Simoa • June 29, 2016

This post is the first in a new feature on Upcoming Pixar where we offer a closer look at Pixar films.

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Dory – everyone’s favorite forgetful blue tang. She’s so beloved that she nearly swims away with Finding Nemo. Nearly, but not quite. One reason why that film is such an unparalleled Pixar entry is because Dory as the scene stealing, ebullient comic relief doesn’t ever overshadow Marlin. We still care about him even though he’s not immediately lovable. (Or arguably, lovable at all).

Now Dory has a movie of her very own. She’s not stealing any scenes because they all belong to her.

In retrospect, focusing the sequel on Dory makes a lot of sense. Andrew Stanton crafted an emotionally resonant story with talking fish that was based on his own observations of fatherhood. That story was finished for the most part. But a new one centered on the silly, eccentric, and carefree secondary character held an ocean of possibility.

Of course, Dory isn’t the first goofy Pixar sidekick to become a protagonist in her own film. Mater was the first in Cars 2. But Finding Dory, unlike Cars 2, was enthusiastically accepted by most. While I do enjoy the latter film, I can understand why others have never been thrilled about a Mater centric movie. Cars 2 was disappointing to many because there was nothing meaningful underneath the hoods. Pixar films can just be fun diversions, but that’s a post for another day. But to everyone’s collective relief, the emotional stakes are higher in Finding Dory. Dory’s presence in Finding Nemo makes that film all the more poignant because her silliness contains pathos. She’s not just the hilarious sidekick.

“Please don’t go away. Please? No one’s ever stuck with me for so long before.”

“And…and I look at you, and I’m home! Please…I don’t want that to go away. I don’t want to forget.”

Is it any wonder that Andrew Stanton felt “very worried about Dory and couldn’t stop thinking about how she needed closure”?

Stanton didn’t work on the sequel right away. It wasn’t until 2011, eight years after Finding Nemo, that he began to consider it. And it clearly took more time to tackle the story before it was officially announced and released into the ocean five years later. This is the usual way sequels are handled at Pixar, with the exception of Toy Story 2. That film had to be salvaged on a tight deadline which makes it all the more impressive.

For all the worry about “Pixar’s decline” and reliance on sequels, critics and fans should rest assured. Finding Dory may not be as seamless as its predecessor, but its story is still meaningful. Art continues to challenge, technology continues to inspire.

Finding Dory should assuage worry in the same way Toy Story 2 and Toy Story 3 did. But the Cars sequels and Toy Story 4 represent too big of a worry. Apparently, Pixar isn’t allowed any missteps. We’ve already seen this with Brave, Monsters University, and more recently, The Good Dinosaur. Those are films that I love dearly. While Finding Dory should remind everyone that Pixar is still in robust shape, creating a sequel that retains the emotional power of its predecessor, that still isn’t enough for most.

But why is Finding Dory so significant, even if it is a dreaded sequel? For starters, it’s only the third Pixar film to feature a female protagonist. A supporting female character with a murky background became much more substantial. Dory was hilarious and heartbreaking in the first film. She still is, but now she’s achieved closure. Her story was given so much love and attention that the sequel, in retrospect, is all the more necessary. And sequels are rarely ever necessary according to the general public.

Then of course, is what her short term memory loss represents. It’s not merely there for laughs.

“I was using her disability to represent everybody. It works for anybody, because nobody is perfect. Everybody has a flaw that they maybe mislabel as such.”

-Andrew Stanton

Her disability doesn’t hinder her from being kind, generous, and friendly. It doesn’t hinder her from demonstrating empathy or discovering other forms of strength. And probably less important, or maybe even more so, is that Marlin and Nemo, along with new friends Hank, Destiny, and Bailey, do not pity Dory. They recognize all the wonderful things she is capable of, not despite her disability, but precisely because of it. They see her, first and foremost, as a friend they love and care about. She recognizes the same and encourages them despite their own limitations. This is a sequel where the characters either overcome their disabilities or still thrive even if they aren’t cured of them. That kind of message is vital for all ages, but especially for the youngest who do make up a large portion of Pixar’s audience.

tumblr_mjzmteGdWm1s714eko1_500When Stanton first revealed how Dory’s disability would be treated (in this excellent interview with Collider), I was reminded of “Toy Story of TERROR!” That short film, like Finding Dory, made a vivacious supporting female character the lead. Jessie’s role in Toy Story 2 functions the same way as Dory’s in Finding Nemo. She adds more emotional weight. In “TERROR!”, Jessie overcomes her claustrophobia in order to save the day. Many fans even praised the sensitive way her panic attacks and anxiety were depicted.

“Jessie never gives up, Jessie finds a way.”

Compare that to Dory’s unflagging optimism in Finding Nemo, along with her insistence that there’s always another way in the sequel. These are two female characters who confront or embrace their weaknesses and disabilities. They refuse to give up even when they’ve seemingly exhausted all their options.

Jessie and Dory assist the male hero but they are well rounded supporting characters in their own right. Jessie was introduced in a sequel while Dory was re-introduced in one of her own. Holly Shiftwell in Cars 2 was Mater’s romantic interest, but she was also a highly skilled secret agent. Whether The Incredibles 2 features any prominent new female characters remains to be seen. Could Helen and/or Violet be protagonists this time around? They’re still compelling even as secondary characters. Cruz Ramirez in Cars 3 is a crucial character, but she’s supporting Lightning McQueen. No doubt she’ll be fun to watch and we should hope for a positive, non stereotypical representation of her Hispanic background.

tumblr_mzxuikdFDd1s5wuldo1_500Now onto Toy Story 4. Woody will be reunited with Bo Peep in a love story. Bo Peep is really the only female character in a Pixar film who is merely peripheral. She had less screentime in Toy Story 2 because, as a porcelain lamp, it wasn’t logical that she’d be able to travel with the other toys around the tri-county area. Her absence in the third film was also a logical choice for the story. It was meant to show that losing friends is inevitable, but also made sense because Molly wouldn’t have assigned Bo Peep any sentimental value and held onto her like Andy did with his toys.

Bo Peep isn’t a dynamic character, but that’s not an issue. She may be on the sidelines, but so are Slinky, Rex, Hamm, and Mr. Potato Head. They’re all colorful, interesting characters, but the motivations and character arcs are reserved for Woody and Buzz.

We don’t know what to expect from Toy Story 4 just yet, but given Pixar’s track record, I think it’s safe to assume that Bo Peep will be an even stronger character in this upcoming installment.

For those who scoff at sequels and Pixar’s recent proliferation of them, their future does appear bleak. It’s much easier to look at Cars 2, Monsters University, Cars 3, and Toy Story 4 as proof positive of Pixar’s decline than to look past those films and remain eager about what else is yet to come. What’s ironic is that no one harbors this kind of pessimism for The Incredibles 2. Doesn’t that film have just as much potential as the others to be unspectacular? The general consensus of course is that The Incredibles 2 is the only sequel capable of being good. But Finding Dory and the Toy Story sequels have proven that to be untrue. Even if Cars 2Monsters University, and The Good Dinosaur are regarded as weak efforts, that still doesn’t mean that Pixar’s creative quality has declined.

I prefer to take an optimistic view of Pixar’s sequels because of the roles Pixar heroines, old and new, get to play. Despite popular beliefs to the contrary, I know there are more original films in the works. Coco is just the only one that’s been announced.

Good stories exist in Pixar’s original films and their sequels. Personally, I have yet to watch a bad Pixar film. Others don’t agree and that’s fine too. I’m not worried about Pixar making a bad film, because as I’ve seen, they’re still making good ones.

Pessimism is tempting, but as Dory says, there’s always another way.

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Interview: David Tanaka on ‘Pixar in Concert’!

Cars 2, Finding Nemo, Interview, Monsters, Inc., OpenSubDiv, Pete Docter, Pixar, Randy Newman, Ratatouille, Soundtrack, The Incredibles, Toy Story, UP, WALL-E

Posted by Brkyo614 • August 4, 2012

Note: This Q&A was conducted by contributor Leo Holzer.

_____

The following is an email interview I had with David Tanaka, the Creative Editor of Pixar in Concert. I’d like to thank Tanaka for his detailed answers and Chris Wiggum at Pixar for arranging the interview.

Q: Please tell me about the process. What prompted the Pixar in Concert idea? How easy was it to get everyone on board and how long did it take from idea to this past weekend’s event?
Tanaka: The entire process for Pixar in Concert actually took around two-plus years, starting in 2010. Show produces Brice Parker and Laurel Ladevich and myself were in constant communication with Pete Docter, Jonas Rivera, and John Lasseter over that period of time, as we sharpened the conceptual approach to the concert, reached out to all the Pixar directors, producers, and music composers, and refined the evolving edited musical suites for each of the Pixar movies to be featured in the performance.

It really all started with a simple, "What if we did a concert on the music of Pixar?" from Brice Parker to Pete Docter. Pete, whose mother is a music instructor and has a strong musical background himself, loved the idea. Based on his interest in the proposal, I started editing a few "sample cuts" on some of the Pixar films in accordance with the base idea. I believe the first few edits included UP, Finding Nemo and the first two Toy Story movies.

After review with Pete and Jonas Rivera, the results were then shown to Disney Music Publishing’s Chris Montan and Tom MacDougall. They in turn embraced the idea and encouraged us to continue to pursue the project.

A few edited iterations and additions later and we had a formal presentation to show to John Lasseter in one of Pixar’s screening review rooms. John also loved the idea and agreed that the concert should really be only about the music – no dialogue at all from the Pixar movies to interrupt the audience’s pleasure listening to the musical scores, very limited sound effects only to enhance the point of the music if need be, and imagery directly from the movies themselves with no additional "bonus material" such as behind-the-scenes conceptual artwork or crew photos.

This would instead be "all about the music", as it relates to what the audiences members themselves experienced when they first enjoyed the Pixar movies through the years.

With this set of parameters understood and agreed upon, a constant stream of editing was produced and sent to Pete and John as our creative executives over the coming months. Given both individuals’ busy schedules and other company commitments, this often resulted in a lot of QuickTime movie files generated and many "iPad" reviews. They in turn would give Brice Parker, Laurel Ladevich and myself cut content feedback via email or voicemail, with occasional formal review get-togethers wherever possible.

We would also arrange for individuals such as music composer Michael Giacchino to stop by my Avid Media Composer edit suite from time to time to review certain cuts (specifically The Incredibles, Ratatouille and Up in Michael’s case). Michael in particular was very gracious with his time, offering great suggestions not only with musical selections, but also pointers on how, for example, to rhythmically transition from low melodies to extremely fast-paced scores and vice-versa in certain cases.

Q: What was your role as creative editor?
Tanaka: My role as Creative Editor entailed performing all edits for the entire set of Pixar musical concert suites, from the first rough-cut conceptual passes to final online polishing. The process involved collaborating with all of the Pixar directors, producers, and music composers to ensure that my personal selection of music and related animated imagery jibed with their expectations for each of the 13 Pixar animated features to date.

Q: Tell me more about the selection and order of clips to support the underlying music.
Tanaka: I was pretty much left to my own accord regarding how to initially approach musical selection and accompanying Pixar picture content. With the amount of creative control I was given, I thought it best to approach the editing process by simply asking myself as a moviegoer, "What are my fondest memories from each of the Pixar movies?" For that reason picture and music were often cut together, directly from each Pixar movie as they were synced for original feature film release, as a starting point.

(But) we had two major challenges throughout the editorial process regarding edited content:

1 – Core Narrative Theme Per Film: Since this concert project is to celebrate the music of Pixar, we don’t necessarily want to re-tell the entire story of each movie, from start to finish, in some kind of condensed cut version. We knew we could pretty much assume that persons paying for tickets to experience this concert had seen most of the Pixar movies, if not all of them. Therefore, from an editorial standpoint, the challenge became how to craft one’s favorite moments from the films into some central narrative core theme or message per movie.

In the case of Ratatouille, for example, it was Remy’s "joy of cooking" over, say, Linguini’s romance story with Collette or his butting heads with Sous Chef Skinner. For Finding Nemo, it was the father/son relationship between Marlin and Nemo despite how entertaining the banter between Marlin and Dory was to watch. For Up, it was — no question — all about Carl Fredricksen’s love for his best friend and wife, Ellie, despite his newfound relationships with Russell, Kevin the bird and talking dog, Dug, in the movie.

In making these clear cut decisions to focus on specific narrative themes, it helped shape the direction of my edits further away from just being "best of" or "highlights" montage reels.

Adhering to this approach of conveying narrative themes as best as possible, however, sometimes meant breaking with the actual chronological unfolding of events as originally presented in the movies.

For Monsters, Inc., for example, to tell the story of Sully’s caring for Boo we needed to first explain how the factory "scare floor" actually worked, with its access to children’s multiple bedrooms. To show how sad it was for Sully to leave Boo behind before he reopens her bedroom door at the end of the movie, however, I decided to introduce the characters’ sad parting scene in "flashback", right before Sully opens the door. Such an arrangement deviated from the feature film, but gave the best emotional payoff possible for the concert audience while at the same time complementing Randy Newman’s underlying score.

Another example is WALL-E in which it was decided early on that we would focus on the romance between the little trash compacting robot and E.V.E, as opposed to the story of "humans in space". Such scenes struck an emotional chord with moviegoers and also offered some of the most beautiful scores Thomas Newman created for the film. In order to center on the romance theme, however, we felt we needed to remind audiences of WALL-E’s personality first – his humor and sense of awe. Again breaking from original feature film release narrative order, I decided to first showcase scenes in which WALL-E comically sifts through trash in his "day job", as well as when he takes in the wonders of the universe upon leaving Earth. Although WALL-E first meets E.V.E. before leaving his home planet, presenting concert audiences with his tour of the universe first made for a better understanding as to why WALL-E is so awe-inspired by E.V.E.‘s ability to fly (when she was introduced on Earth) and how easy it was to immediately fall in love with her.

2 – Concert Performance Time Constraints: The other challenge to editing this concert was purely logistical: time. Working closely with San Francisco’s Davies Symphony Hall, we determined that a concert event of this type should run approximately 90 minutes in total length, with a 20-minute intermission included. With 13 Pixar feature animated motion pictures to account for, that roughly determined that each of my edited suites should run for as short as four minutes to as long as seven or eight minutes, but no longer. Given the adherence to highlighting particular narrative themes per movie and the ability to shift scenes out of sequence, I could cut in accordance to such time constraints, and as a whole deliver edited concert material within the requested 70-minute total running time.

In the final stages of production, my job as Creative Editor also entailed final video projection quality checks with Brice Parker and Laurel Ladevich prior to the actual live performances at San Francisco’s Davies Symphony Hall, connecting with Disney Music Publishing’s team of Johnathan Heely and Ed Kainins to go over technical concerns regarding smooth video projection playback rates and cross-comparing conductor versus audience synced video footage, and also communicating with Music Arranger, Mark Watters, regarding any last (minute) questions or suggestions during rehearsals with Conductor Sarah Hicks and the Davies Symphony Orchestra.

Q: I found it interesting that the music wasn’t shown in chronological order starting with Toy Story and ending with Brave. Knowing Pixar, I knew there was some thought given to the program arrangement. Can you tell me more about the decision-making?
Tanaka: It was such an interesting selection process to go through regarding concert program arrangement, for we definitely had several key points of criteria to consider. Right from the start, however, the one fact we knew didn’t make any sense to adhere to was the chronological order in which the Pixar movies were originally released. "So what," right? As personal fans of cinema ourselves, our love of movies really has no bearing on compartmentalizing feature films to what specific year they were shown to the public for the very first time. (We just love them!)

Bryond starting the concert with Pixar’s first film Toy Story as sort of an homage to "the little film company that could", the program arrangement of the other movies came down to other factors. Those factors included:

  • who the Pixar director and music composer were for each production
  • if that particular production was a Pixar sequel
  • and, the resulting overall tone of the piece I ended up editing to represent each movie.

We really felt that the specific movies per each of our five Pixar directors (Andrews, Bird, Docter, Lasseter, and Stanton) should be equally spread across the program as opposed to being clumped together since there may be aesthetic similarities if we group one filmmaker’s body of work one after another. Why not instead spread them out?

Similarly, we felt that our four Pixar music composers (Doyle, Giacchino, R. Newman and T. Newman) should also be separated across the entire concert so their composing styles could be best appreciated played in contrast to one another, as opposed to being performed one after another.

In addition, it only made sense that Pixar sequels (such as sequels for the Toy Story and Cars sagas) should be separated from one another in the program so they could be appreciated on their own merits, and not unfairly condensed down as if to imply that they together represent just one story and individually nothing more.

Lastly,, the final edited suite I created for each Pixar movie was then assessed for content and the resulting overall tone that was created. For example, The Incredibles and Cars 2  suites I cut really celebrated the action adventure spirit contained in each of those films, therefore they should perhaps not be placed next to each other in order to give the audience variety spread across the entire concert.

On the other end of the spectrum, Finding Nemo and Up evolved into offering two of our most dramatic and emotional suites for the evening, therefore they should intentionally be set apart from each other for optimum audience appreciation.

David Tanaka then volunteered some "closing thoughts":

As mentioned, the entire process lasted for (more than) two years, with much collaboration and back and forth communication from all involved. It was truly a fun process for myself and everyone involved, all in the name of our love of musical scores.

In addition to the satisfaction of representing our Pixar movies, directors, music composers and movie soundtracks as best as possible, having audience members experience and enjoy Pixar’s 13 movies through music and just in the span of a mere 90-minute concert performance was an extremely rewarding experience for me as the project’s Creative Editor, and hopefully for the audience as well!

——-

Have you experienced Pixar in Concert?

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Woody’s News Round-Up! (06/30/12)

Brave, Cars, Cars 2, Finding Nemo, Imagineering, Knick Knack, La Luna, Round-Ups, Toy Story

Posted by Brkyo614 • June 30, 2012

With all of the Brave news lately, a few small stories pertaining to Pixar’s other works have fallen under the radar. Get caught up below!

The Making of Cars Land Featurette: An impressive recreation of the Cars films’ Radiator Springs, Cars Land, opened at Disney California Adventure this month. For a better look at the planning process behind the area, including surprisingly touching interviews from Disney Imagineers, Disney released a wonderful 13-minute documentary on the Disney Parks Youtube page:

Finding Nemo Blu-ray Details + Future Pixar Merchandise: At a recent Disney merchandising expo, Pixar Times snapped a picture of the back of the upcoming Finding Nemo Blu-ray cover, outlining the special features to be included in the release. Take a look to the right; I’m definitely anticipating the CineExplore feature, a strong visual supplement to the standard DVD audio commentary.

An assortment of upcoming Pixar toys were also exhibited by Disney, and Pixar Times got an extensive look at the selection here. Brave, Toy Story, and Cars products were all shown off, and include some hints regarding the rumored Toy Story Toon, Partysaurus Rex.

La Luna Merchandise Now Available: Pixar products and toys aren’t exactly scarce, but tie-ins to their short films are a different story. However, the Disney Store has just put out a great La Luna plush based on the main character of the short, Bambino. The toy is available both on its own or with a storybook signed by director Enrico Casarosa. It’s a fantastic addition to any Pixar fan’s collection.

Your thoughts?

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Now Available: Cars 2 on Blu-ray/DVD + Toy Story Trilogy!

Blu-Ray, Cars 2, DVD, Toy Story, Toy Story 2, Toy Story 3

Posted by Martin • November 1, 2011

A truckload of Pixar releases hit stores today including a wide range of Cars 2 home video options and the Toy Story Trilogy bundle.

The standard Cars 2 Blu-ray and DVD "combo packs" are pretty bare bones when it comes to bonus features and other goodies, but the HD picture is as eye-popping as ever. Included on every release is an audio commentary with John Lasseter and Brad Lewis, Hawaiian Vacation, and the brand new "Cars Toons" short, Air Mater.

If you’ve seen the other "Mater’s Tall Tales" vignettes, the set-up for Air Mater will be pretty familiar. Re-imagining Mater as a plane was a clever touch that lends to the series’ tongue-in-cheek style of humor. It’s also fun to note that this is Pixar Canada’s first project. Look out for the nod to DisneyToon’s upcoming Planes at the end.

As with other Pixar releases, director John Lasseter and co-director Brad Lewis add rich perspective in the commentary while the film moves from one jaw-dropping locale to another, equally breathtaking setting. The 5-disc 3D Blu-ray + Blu-ray + DVD "combo pack" includes a wealth of special features which unfortunately, we weren’t able to review.

The Toy Story Trilogy, bundled for the first time on 3D Blu-ray, also hits stores today. Standalone 3D releases of Toy Story, Toy Story 2 and Toy Story 3 will be available separately as well.

Have you had the chance to check out any of these releases?

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Preview Cars 2 on Blu-ray: Getting Behind the Wheel!

Blu-Ray, Cars 2

Posted by Martin • October 13, 2011

An exclusive clip from the Blu-ray release of Cars 2 was recently uploaded onto the official Disney/Pixar YouTube channel.

To prepare for the production of the high-octane sequel, co-director Brad Lewis and a team of animators got behind the wheel of ‘souped-up cars’ at the Infineon Raceway. Witness the adrenaline rush of Pixar’s famous research trips in this excerpt from the film’s bonus materials:
Cars 2 on Blu-ray races into stores on November 1!
Your thoughts?

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Box-Office Buzz: Cars 2 Falling Behind; Any Hope Left?

Box Office, Cars 2

Posted by Martin • July 18, 2011

After a promising run, Cars 2 seems to have slipped behind bigger films in this congested summer season.

Cliches aside, we really hate to be the bearers of bad news here at Upcoming Pixar. Unfortunately, this weekend’s numbers have only painted a negative picture for Cars 2. With a combined Friday and Sunday take of $5 million and a Saturday total of $3.5 million, Pixar’s latest clocks in at:

$165,389,754

Granted, a weekend total of a little over $8 million is not bad for any film, especially this far out and with competition such as the final Harry Potter flick. However, this does track Cars 2 behind Ratatouille, Pixar’s least commercially successful film of the last decade. The only thing that might push Cars 2 past the $200 million mark would be a final Labor Day boost.

Fortunately, every cloud has a silver lining. Internationally, Cars 2 is performing well with a total take of about $121 million for a combined worldwide gross of about $286 million. The film has yet to open in major markets including the UK.

Your thoughts?

(via Box Office Mojo)

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Pre-Order Cars 2 on Blu-ray! [UPDATE]

Blu-Ray, Cars 2

Posted by Martin • July 16, 2011

Well that was quick!

Amazon.com and other online retailers recently listed Cars 2 for pre-order less than one month after its theatrical release. Cover artwork has also hit the web and it appears to be final.

No word on an official release date, but expect to see Cars 2 in stores sometime in November as most Pixar films have their home video premiere around that time. Currently, a 5-disc 3D Blu-ray Combo Pack and a 3-Disc Blu-ray set are listed online. Both packs include DVDs.

Update: A standard DVD package (with Blu-ray discs included) and a "Director’s Edition", featuring a whopping 11-discs, have also been listed on Amazon. It’s worth noting that this will be Pixar’s first 3D home video release.

Could an early listing signal an earlier release?

(via The Pixar Blog)

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Cars 2: The Video Game Developers Closely Collaborate with Pixar!

Cars 2, Video Game

Posted by Martin • July 14, 2011

Did you know that Avalanche Software closely collaborated with Pixar Animation Studios to create Cars 2: The Video Game?

In "Pixar Perfect", the developers of the addictive tie-in game discuss their early relationship with the Emeryville animation unit in order to stay true to the film’s vision. Creators of Toy Story 3: The Video Game, the folks at Avalanche continue to defy the stereotype that movie-based games are lacking in quality:

Cars 2: The Video Game is in stores now! This blogger highly recommends it— I’m not a hardcore gamer, but I’ve had a ton of fun racing around iconic locales and going through the different stages. Don’t just take it from me, reviews for the game have been overwhelmingly positive.

Have you had a chance to play Cars 2: The Video Game?

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A Day in the Life of John Lasseter!

Cars 2, John Lasseter

Posted by Martin • July 12, 2011

In a newly released mini-documentary, fans can experience the fun and stress of a day in the life of John Lasseter.

One can only imagine what it would be like heading both Disney and Pixar Animation Studios as Chief Creative Officer, consulting for the theme parks and being a full time movie director. The following clip highlights one of Lasseter’s typical days on the final lap of Cars 2 production:

That’s dedication! Recommend this much-watch to your friends!

Your thoughts?

(via Disney Netherlands/StitchKingdom/PixarTimes)

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