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WALL·E Turns 10 Today! – 10 Reasons Why WALL·E Is One Of The Best Pixar Movies

Anniversary, Opinion Piece, WALL-E

Posted by Joanna • June 27, 2018

June 27th 2008 – the day WALL·E was released widely in theatres across North America. Exactly 10 years later, we’re celebrating WALL·E’s 10th anniversary with 10 reasons why we think WALL·E still deserves the title of ‘One Of The Best Pixar Movies’ (we feel that the conclusive ‘Best Pixar Movie’ title doesn’t, and shouldn’t, exist!). Read on to discover why co-writers Nia and Joanna believe WALL·E will always deserve a place in the Pixar Hall of Fame.

Nia

Nia

1. Lack of Dialogue

One of the most iconic aspects about WALL·E is the fact that more than half of the film is done without dialogue. The film just wouldn’t be the same if the loveable robot could speak or if WALL·E and EVE had a romantic conversation as they watched the sun set. Animation means so much to me because there are literally no rules as to how someone could tell a story – you can have toys coming to life, bugs rebelling against grasshoppers, etc., but each of those unique stories could be told in so many different ways. In WALL·E  we follow a robot on this massive adventure as he leaves the  garbage-ridden planet he calls home, flies through space and eventually makes it on-board a fancy spaceship, but we see it all without dialogue and we barely even notice. There is so much that can be said with a simple glance, a gesture, or even a brief cut that 12 pages of dialogue can never achieve. WALL·E is a testament to that – even though the film is now ten years old, it’s still ambitious and there hasn’t been a film yet to challenge its lack of dialogue.

2. The Love Story

Stand aside, Rapunzel and Finn, you too Cinderella and Prince Charming, because WALL·E and EVE might be the most iconic couple in animation history. There’s nothing better than an unconventional love story, especially one that doesn’t even revolve around humans. When I first went into the cinema to watch WALL·E, I had no idea that the core of the film would revolve around WALL·E and his heart of gold as he tries to win the affections of EVE. Not only does he share all the things he loves with EVE when she visits earth, but he follows her all over space, and even risks his life to save her at the end. WALL·E, a true gentleman robot, even protects EVE and watches after her once she shuts down while on earth. Opposites attract in the most beautiful ways with their relationship. Hey, I know it’s been 10 years but I’m still waiting for a scene of them flying off into the sunset holding hands and singing along to Hello, Dolly!

WALL·E concept art by Ralph Eggleston

3. Classic Film References

Speaking of Hello, Dolly! One of the reasons this film is so special is because of all the beautiful references to this iconic musical. Lets talk about that opening sequence and the use of Put on Your Sunday Clothes:

“Out there
There’s a world outside of Yonkers
Way out there beyond this hick town, Barnaby
There’s a slick town, Barnaby
Out there
Full of shine and full of sparkle
Close your eyes and see it glisten, Barnaby
Listen, Barnaby”

The lyrics are dripping with nostalgia and fit WALL·E’s story almost perfectly – the urge to make earth the way it once was, before it was overflowing with garbage and waste, and to set off into space, exploring the world outside of the planet. Those lyrics also capture the whimsically and childlike wonder of WALL·E. It might seem odd there’s such a random focus on Hello, Dolly! But it makes sense in relation to the story. WALL·E only has the VHS copy of the musical to keep him company on earth. Just like his cockroach friend, Hello, Dolly! Is one of his companions and part of him; it’s what keeps him going and motivated throughout the film.

Another great reference to classic film is of course, the evil robot AUTO on the human’s spaceship. The chilling personality of the robot resembles the infamous HAL: 9000 from 2001: A Space Oddity; from the deadpan voice to the robot’s design, it’s hard to ignore that the film directly influenced the character.

4. Character Designs

One of the most charming elements about WALL·E is all the character designs – they’re simple and efficient, we don’t need to have all the detail in the world thrown into WALL·E, EVE, or even the humans to care for them, to root for them. There’s just enough detail as to not distract us from the heart of the story. The design of AUTO is also simplistic, he looks like a steering wheel for Pete’s sake, and yet we’re terrified of him and want him to be shut down completely for the sake of team WALL·E. From the dirty, clunky box shapes of WALL·E, and the sleek and oval designs of Eve, to even the round and disproportioned humans; the way each character was crafted tells us perfectly about who they are and how they interact with others in the world around them. At first all of the different character shapes look like a game of Tetris; you don’t think they’re going to be a match but then you realize how they move and flow and work together to save the day and they all fit perfectly into place, as if they were always meant to be together.

5. Director Andrew Stanton

I don’t know about you, but sometimes I like to think about how another director at Pixar would’ve handled WALL·E. If Brad Bird or Pete Docter directed the film, it just wouldn’t have been the same. Granted, it would’ve been a brilliant film but it would’ve been different. WALL·E would’ve been there, maybe the same story would’ve remained intact, but the vision would’ve been something else entirely. Each director brings a part of themselves on to their projects – if you gave me and a few other storytellers the same prompt and told us to write a 90-page screenplay, each one would be dissimilar. WALL·E works so well because it’s Andrew Stanton’s vision. You look at this film and it fits so well with the other stories on his fantastic repertoire – A Bug’s Life, Finding Nemo, and even Finding Dory; Stanton’s films are always so simplistic, ambitious, and character driven. He pushes his characters out of their comfort zones, putting them into these massive environments and seeing how they’re going to react: Flick leaving the comforts of the colony in A Bug’s Life, Marlin facing his fears and literally swimming out into the deep blue sea in Finding Nemo, and even WALL·E flying into space to follow the love of his life; there’s a common theme of exploration, both internally and externally, with Stanton’s films.

Joanna

Joanna

6. Its Strong Environmental Message

One of the reasons I adore Pixar movies is because of the striking messages that are always so perfectly communicated within them. WALL·E is a perfect example of this – WALL·E himself teaches us to be kind and loyal, and the film’s overarching environmental and commercial themes make it forever, and increasingly, relevant. Some found the environmental message to be too obvious or too ‘in your face’, but I think it was a brave move on Pixar’s part. We’re in a strange situation at the moment – species are edging towards extinction wherever you look, but for the most part the world is almost choosing to look in the other direction. I love that WALL·E wasn’t afraid to put its environmental message right at its core. Pixar wasn’t lecturing us – the lesson was interwoven into a unique, universal love story. The moment I first saw WALL·E gaze at that single green, thriving sapling with pure wonder, I knew I was watching something special.

7. The Size and Setting

Not many Pixar movies can claim that they took their audiences across the galaxy. World-building is a tricky thing – I feel like it must be even more difficult when creating an animated movie. You’re transporting people to fantastical worlds that need to feel real and believable, but not so real and believable that the magic is lost. The fact that WALL·E takes place in several incredibly distinct settings, spanning across an entire universe, while still managing to focus on its characters and its story is amazing to me. WALL·E is ambitious. The movie’s opening quite literally sets the scene by showing stunning shots in outer space – it starts off big, immediately scales down to WALL·E’s own little world, and then blasts us back off into the stars again.

8. The Music

Thomas Newman, the composer for Finding Nemo, Finding Dory, and of course WALL·E, does an astounding job at filling huge, open worlds with wonder and beauty. In a movie with very little dialogue, especially between the two main protagonists, the music needs to be expressive and descriptive – it needs to envelope the viewer in the story and help them connect and empathise with the characters. Newman’s score does exactly this. And on top of all that, how does the soundtrack somehow mingle seamlessly with 60’s Broadway music, Louis Armstrong’s cover of La Vie En Rose (1950), and catchy BnL jingles? It’s kind of genius.

9. The Sound Effects

WALL·E and EVE can’t exactly speak, so why is it so easy to understand what they’re communicating? A big part of this is the clever animation of gestures, but also the creation of futuristic yet familiar sound effects. Ben Burtt, who is famously known for creating the ‘voice’ of R2-D2 in Star Wars (along with many other iconic Star Wars sound effects), was the sound designer for WALL·E and could even be credited as the ‘voice’ of WALL·E himself. I love the sound effects in WALL·E. I love how they flesh out the oddly beautiful post-apocalyptic world that we’re introduced to. I love how they don’t exactly give the robots ‘voices’ or a language, but the whistles, tones, and clicks are more than enough to give them character and emotions. It’s so clever, and again, so ambitious.

10. Define Dancing

Yes, I am going to argue that this single scene is a reason why WALL·E is up there with the Pixar greats.

If someone were to ask me to pick a favourite Pixar scene, after much inner turmoil, I would probably say Define Dancing. The scene where WALL·E and EVE dance in space. It sounds simple and uneventful (and maybe that’s partly why I’m so in love with it), but it’s also the epitome of everything that I admire about the movie. Dialogue takes a back seat and gives way to storytelling through sensitive animation and moving, swelling music. It’s the high point of the beautifully unconventional love story. We thought this iconic scene was such a perfect example of everything that WALL·E did right that it perfectly exemplifies why it’s one of the best Pixar movies, all on its own.

 

 

Are you going to celebrate WALL·E‘s 10th anniversary by watching it this evening? We guarantee it will only make your day better!

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Our Favorite Pixar Movies Are Taking Flight!

Incredibles 2, Pixar, Toy Story, WALL-E

Posted by Joanna • May 5, 2018

You may remember that last year, in the run-up to the release of Coco, Pixar teamed up with Southwest Airlines and unveiled a Coco themed airplane, and it seems like this is becoming somewhat of a trend.

To celebrate the opening of Toy Story Land in Shanghai, China Eastern Airlines worked with the Shanghai Disney Resort to create an entirely Toy Story themed plane. The outside is boldly painted with a giant Buzz Lightyear. Let’s hope his flying is flying rather than “falling with style” this time! It took its first flight at the end of April.

© Disney

And it’s not just the outside that’s been adorned with Toy Story characters and references – the inside really goes the extra mile. The ceiling is decorated with those familiar Toy Story clouds, and all the seats have one of the many popular characters on them, including Woody, Jessie, Rex, Trixie, and even Lotso (Lotso is a big thing in China – who knew?). Passengers are even served Toy Story themed refreshments, offered Toy Story themed headphones, and given commemorative Toy Story boarding passes to take away as a souvenir.

© Disney

But Toy Story isn’t the only Pixar movie franchise that has been upgraded to first class – today, Pixar revealed the all new Incredibles 2 Alaska Air plane! To celebrate Alaska Airlines Aviation Day, the plane was unveiled today in Seattle and it couldn’t look more super.

“These characters are among the most celebrated characters in the Pixar family. After waiting 14 years to see them on the big screen again, fans will love seeing them on their Alaska Airlines plane, too.”

(Incredibles 2 producers Nicole Grindle and John Walker)

Pixar also posted timelapse footage, showing how the Incredibles 2 plane came to life. Watch it below:

If you look closely, you’ll see a very concerned raccoon on the tail of the plane, almost as if it’s holding on for dear life. This raccoon has been hinted as being Jack Jack’s arch nemesis in the eagerly awaited Incredibles sequel.

It’s amazing, and oddly inspiring, to think that these planes are making flights in our skies at the moment – the sky’s the limit! Or is it? Here’s some news that’s a bit more cosmic in ambition: NASA have named two of their satellites after WALL-E and EVE, the lovebird robots from 2008’s WALL-E. They’re to be launched into space this weekend, on course for Mars!

The satellites are maybe a bit of a one-off thing, but it seems likely that Pixar themed airplanes will be something we’ll see again in the future! Let us know if you’re ever lucky enough to book a flight on one of them.

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New Disney/Pixar Gallery Nucleus Exhibition Opens in Los Angeles

30 Years of Pixar, A Bug's Life, Art, Cars, Cars 2, Finding Dory, Finding Nemo, Inside Out, John Lasseter, Monsters University, Monsters, Inc., Ratatouille, The Incredibles, Toy Story, Toy Story 2, Toy Story 3, WALL-E

Posted by Nia • December 10, 2016

Have you ever wanted to see some of your favorite artwork from Pixar films in real life? Fear no more, as a new exhibition has just opened up at Gallery Nucleus in LA today. For the first time ever, the gallery will be showcasing brand new images from each of Pixar’s feature films. What makes it even more unique is that John Lasseter himself picked each design for the show. There will also be hand-signed limited edition prints for sale by each artist who worked on the pieces.

Thanks to Oh My Disney for providing the artwork that will be featured at the showcase.

By Bob Pauley

By Bob Pauley

 

By Tia Kratter

By Tia Kratter

 

By Randy Barret

By Randy Barret

 

By Pete Docter

By Pete Docter

 

By Ralph Eggleston

By Ralph Eggleston

 

By Teddy Newton

By Teddy Newton

 

By Bill Cone

By Bill Cone

 

By Dominique Louis

By Dominique Louis

 

By Ralph Eggleston

By Ralph Eggleston

 

By Lou Romano

By Lou Romano

 

By Robert Kondo

By Robert Kondo

 

By Harley Jessup

By Harley Jessup

 

By Steve Pilch

By Steve Pilch

 

By Rickey Nierva

By Rickey Nierva

 

By Ralph Eggleston

By Ralph Eggleston

 

By Sharon Calahan

By Sharon Calahan

 

By Daniel L Munoz

By Daniel L Munoz

 

Be sure to check out Galley Nucleus and celebrate the art of Pixar if you’re in town – it runs from today, December 10th to January 8th, 2017.

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Interview: David Tanaka on ‘Pixar in Concert’!

Cars 2, Finding Nemo, Interview, Monsters, Inc., OpenSubDiv, Pete Docter, Pixar, Randy Newman, Ratatouille, Soundtrack, The Incredibles, Toy Story, UP, WALL-E

Posted by Brkyo614 • August 4, 2012

Note: This Q&A was conducted by contributor Leo Holzer.

_____

The following is an email interview I had with David Tanaka, the Creative Editor of Pixar in Concert. I’d like to thank Tanaka for his detailed answers and Chris Wiggum at Pixar for arranging the interview.

Q: Please tell me about the process. What prompted the Pixar in Concert idea? How easy was it to get everyone on board and how long did it take from idea to this past weekend’s event?
Tanaka: The entire process for Pixar in Concert actually took around two-plus years, starting in 2010. Show produces Brice Parker and Laurel Ladevich and myself were in constant communication with Pete Docter, Jonas Rivera, and John Lasseter over that period of time, as we sharpened the conceptual approach to the concert, reached out to all the Pixar directors, producers, and music composers, and refined the evolving edited musical suites for each of the Pixar movies to be featured in the performance.

It really all started with a simple, "What if we did a concert on the music of Pixar?" from Brice Parker to Pete Docter. Pete, whose mother is a music instructor and has a strong musical background himself, loved the idea. Based on his interest in the proposal, I started editing a few "sample cuts" on some of the Pixar films in accordance with the base idea. I believe the first few edits included UP, Finding Nemo and the first two Toy Story movies.

After review with Pete and Jonas Rivera, the results were then shown to Disney Music Publishing’s Chris Montan and Tom MacDougall. They in turn embraced the idea and encouraged us to continue to pursue the project.

A few edited iterations and additions later and we had a formal presentation to show to John Lasseter in one of Pixar’s screening review rooms. John also loved the idea and agreed that the concert should really be only about the music – no dialogue at all from the Pixar movies to interrupt the audience’s pleasure listening to the musical scores, very limited sound effects only to enhance the point of the music if need be, and imagery directly from the movies themselves with no additional "bonus material" such as behind-the-scenes conceptual artwork or crew photos.

This would instead be "all about the music", as it relates to what the audiences members themselves experienced when they first enjoyed the Pixar movies through the years.

With this set of parameters understood and agreed upon, a constant stream of editing was produced and sent to Pete and John as our creative executives over the coming months. Given both individuals’ busy schedules and other company commitments, this often resulted in a lot of QuickTime movie files generated and many "iPad" reviews. They in turn would give Brice Parker, Laurel Ladevich and myself cut content feedback via email or voicemail, with occasional formal review get-togethers wherever possible.

We would also arrange for individuals such as music composer Michael Giacchino to stop by my Avid Media Composer edit suite from time to time to review certain cuts (specifically The Incredibles, Ratatouille and Up in Michael’s case). Michael in particular was very gracious with his time, offering great suggestions not only with musical selections, but also pointers on how, for example, to rhythmically transition from low melodies to extremely fast-paced scores and vice-versa in certain cases.

Q: What was your role as creative editor?
Tanaka: My role as Creative Editor entailed performing all edits for the entire set of Pixar musical concert suites, from the first rough-cut conceptual passes to final online polishing. The process involved collaborating with all of the Pixar directors, producers, and music composers to ensure that my personal selection of music and related animated imagery jibed with their expectations for each of the 13 Pixar animated features to date.

Q: Tell me more about the selection and order of clips to support the underlying music.
Tanaka: I was pretty much left to my own accord regarding how to initially approach musical selection and accompanying Pixar picture content. With the amount of creative control I was given, I thought it best to approach the editing process by simply asking myself as a moviegoer, "What are my fondest memories from each of the Pixar movies?" For that reason picture and music were often cut together, directly from each Pixar movie as they were synced for original feature film release, as a starting point.

(But) we had two major challenges throughout the editorial process regarding edited content:

1 – Core Narrative Theme Per Film: Since this concert project is to celebrate the music of Pixar, we don’t necessarily want to re-tell the entire story of each movie, from start to finish, in some kind of condensed cut version. We knew we could pretty much assume that persons paying for tickets to experience this concert had seen most of the Pixar movies, if not all of them. Therefore, from an editorial standpoint, the challenge became how to craft one’s favorite moments from the films into some central narrative core theme or message per movie.

In the case of Ratatouille, for example, it was Remy’s "joy of cooking" over, say, Linguini’s romance story with Collette or his butting heads with Sous Chef Skinner. For Finding Nemo, it was the father/son relationship between Marlin and Nemo despite how entertaining the banter between Marlin and Dory was to watch. For Up, it was — no question — all about Carl Fredricksen’s love for his best friend and wife, Ellie, despite his newfound relationships with Russell, Kevin the bird and talking dog, Dug, in the movie.

In making these clear cut decisions to focus on specific narrative themes, it helped shape the direction of my edits further away from just being "best of" or "highlights" montage reels.

Adhering to this approach of conveying narrative themes as best as possible, however, sometimes meant breaking with the actual chronological unfolding of events as originally presented in the movies.

For Monsters, Inc., for example, to tell the story of Sully’s caring for Boo we needed to first explain how the factory "scare floor" actually worked, with its access to children’s multiple bedrooms. To show how sad it was for Sully to leave Boo behind before he reopens her bedroom door at the end of the movie, however, I decided to introduce the characters’ sad parting scene in "flashback", right before Sully opens the door. Such an arrangement deviated from the feature film, but gave the best emotional payoff possible for the concert audience while at the same time complementing Randy Newman’s underlying score.

Another example is WALL-E in which it was decided early on that we would focus on the romance between the little trash compacting robot and E.V.E, as opposed to the story of "humans in space". Such scenes struck an emotional chord with moviegoers and also offered some of the most beautiful scores Thomas Newman created for the film. In order to center on the romance theme, however, we felt we needed to remind audiences of WALL-E’s personality first – his humor and sense of awe. Again breaking from original feature film release narrative order, I decided to first showcase scenes in which WALL-E comically sifts through trash in his "day job", as well as when he takes in the wonders of the universe upon leaving Earth. Although WALL-E first meets E.V.E. before leaving his home planet, presenting concert audiences with his tour of the universe first made for a better understanding as to why WALL-E is so awe-inspired by E.V.E.‘s ability to fly (when she was introduced on Earth) and how easy it was to immediately fall in love with her.

2 – Concert Performance Time Constraints: The other challenge to editing this concert was purely logistical: time. Working closely with San Francisco’s Davies Symphony Hall, we determined that a concert event of this type should run approximately 90 minutes in total length, with a 20-minute intermission included. With 13 Pixar feature animated motion pictures to account for, that roughly determined that each of my edited suites should run for as short as four minutes to as long as seven or eight minutes, but no longer. Given the adherence to highlighting particular narrative themes per movie and the ability to shift scenes out of sequence, I could cut in accordance to such time constraints, and as a whole deliver edited concert material within the requested 70-minute total running time.

In the final stages of production, my job as Creative Editor also entailed final video projection quality checks with Brice Parker and Laurel Ladevich prior to the actual live performances at San Francisco’s Davies Symphony Hall, connecting with Disney Music Publishing’s team of Johnathan Heely and Ed Kainins to go over technical concerns regarding smooth video projection playback rates and cross-comparing conductor versus audience synced video footage, and also communicating with Music Arranger, Mark Watters, regarding any last (minute) questions or suggestions during rehearsals with Conductor Sarah Hicks and the Davies Symphony Orchestra.

Q: I found it interesting that the music wasn’t shown in chronological order starting with Toy Story and ending with Brave. Knowing Pixar, I knew there was some thought given to the program arrangement. Can you tell me more about the decision-making?
Tanaka: It was such an interesting selection process to go through regarding concert program arrangement, for we definitely had several key points of criteria to consider. Right from the start, however, the one fact we knew didn’t make any sense to adhere to was the chronological order in which the Pixar movies were originally released. "So what," right? As personal fans of cinema ourselves, our love of movies really has no bearing on compartmentalizing feature films to what specific year they were shown to the public for the very first time. (We just love them!)

Bryond starting the concert with Pixar’s first film Toy Story as sort of an homage to "the little film company that could", the program arrangement of the other movies came down to other factors. Those factors included:

  • who the Pixar director and music composer were for each production
  • if that particular production was a Pixar sequel
  • and, the resulting overall tone of the piece I ended up editing to represent each movie.

We really felt that the specific movies per each of our five Pixar directors (Andrews, Bird, Docter, Lasseter, and Stanton) should be equally spread across the program as opposed to being clumped together since there may be aesthetic similarities if we group one filmmaker’s body of work one after another. Why not instead spread them out?

Similarly, we felt that our four Pixar music composers (Doyle, Giacchino, R. Newman and T. Newman) should also be separated across the entire concert so their composing styles could be best appreciated played in contrast to one another, as opposed to being performed one after another.

In addition, it only made sense that Pixar sequels (such as sequels for the Toy Story and Cars sagas) should be separated from one another in the program so they could be appreciated on their own merits, and not unfairly condensed down as if to imply that they together represent just one story and individually nothing more.

Lastly,, the final edited suite I created for each Pixar movie was then assessed for content and the resulting overall tone that was created. For example, The Incredibles and Cars 2  suites I cut really celebrated the action adventure spirit contained in each of those films, therefore they should perhaps not be placed next to each other in order to give the audience variety spread across the entire concert.

On the other end of the spectrum, Finding Nemo and Up evolved into offering two of our most dramatic and emotional suites for the evening, therefore they should intentionally be set apart from each other for optimum audience appreciation.

David Tanaka then volunteered some "closing thoughts":

As mentioned, the entire process lasted for (more than) two years, with much collaboration and back and forth communication from all involved. It was truly a fun process for myself and everyone involved, all in the name of our love of musical scores.

In addition to the satisfaction of representing our Pixar movies, directors, music composers and movie soundtracks as best as possible, having audience members experience and enjoy Pixar’s 13 movies through music and just in the span of a mere 90-minute concert performance was an extremely rewarding experience for me as the project’s Creative Editor, and hopefully for the audience as well!

——-

Have you experienced Pixar in Concert?

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Woody’s News Round-Up! (08/03/12)

Art Of:, Disney, Fandom, Monsters, Inc., OpenSubDiv, Round-Ups, WALL-E

Posted by Brkyo614 • August 3, 2012

Though the summer can be a bit dry when it comes to Pixar news, here are a few stories to tide you over until the next major announcement from the studio.

First Look at Pixar-Inspired Disney Cruise: This Fall, Disney is inviting guests into the world of Pixar through a series of themed California coastal cruises. Offerings on the boat include encounters with meet-and-greet characters, art exhibits, talks with Pixar artists, and opportunities to enjoy all of Pixar’s productions, including Finding Nemo 3D. If you’re not convinced that this is a once-in-a-lifetime experience, Disney has put up a promo video featuring words from Pixar’s John Lasseter:

The cruises set off from Los Angeles beginning on September 16.

Pixar in Concert Debuts in San Francisco: Any fan of Pixar or film in general knows that strong music can bring a great story to powerful new heights. Pixar in Concert exists to remind listeners of this through an orchestral compilation of the most memorable Pixar music. The show premiered this past weekend at the Davies Symphony Hall in San Francisco, and Jim Hill Media provided an excellent summary of the proceedings here. The event continues on Friday, Saturday, and Sunday this weekend at the Hollywood Bowl.

The Art of Monsters, Inc. Reprinted:
Chronicle Books’ look at the conception of Monsters, Inc. has become a rarity over the years, sometimes fetching hundreds of dollars from online bids. Just in time for Monsters University, though, Chronicle has finally made the sought-after book available on their site once more for $40. Be sure to take a look!

Builder Brings WALL-E to Life: Pixar fan works aren’t uncommon, but rarely is as much effort seen in a project as what Mike Senna put into this real life WALL-E bot. It took over two years of hard work to build the creation, but Senna explains that the touching reactions from children made it all worth it in this video from The Yo Show.

Your thoughts?

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Pixar Classics to be Re-Released in AMC Theatres!

Ratatouille, Toy Story 3, UP, WALL-E

Posted by Brkyo614 • May 18, 2012

Seeing a Pixar film theatrically has always been a special experience. It’s been difficult to relive these films again on the big screen, but re-releases such as the Toy Story double feature and the upcoming 3D versions of Monsters, Inc. and Finding Nemo have helped alleviate this problem. Now AMC Theatres is offering the chance to once again enjoy a line-up of recent Pixar hits the way they were meant to be seen!

Ratatouille, WALL-E, Up, and Toy Story 3 will screened at select AMC Theatres in a limited engagement from May 25 to May 28, 2012. Toy Story 3 and Up are set to be shown in 3D, making this the first chance to catch the 3D version of Up since its 2009 release. Each screening will also be accompanied by an exclusive behind-the-scenes look at Brave.

Tickets are priced at a discounted $6, ideal for families and anyone hoping to hold a movie marathon. To see if your local theatre is participating and order tickets, head over to the AMC website here.

Do you plan to re-experience Pixar’s slate of classics next weekend?

Correction: Contrary to listings on the AMC Theatres website, Toy Story 3 and Up will not be screened in 3D.

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WALL•E is Back on The Simpsons!

WALL-E

Posted by Martin • March 25, 2010

WALL•E recently made another cameo appearance on FOX’s hit-animated sitcom, The Simpsons! This time, our favorite little robot is joined by none other than his true love EVE!

In last week’s episode "Stealing First Base", Bart Simpson is knocked unconscious by his sweetheart Nikki triggering a montage of memorable movie kisses. The famous Pixar couple is included in a spoof of the Define Dancing sequence leading up to the electrifying “kiss.”

Watch the clip below, note that international readers may not be able to play the video as it is region locked:

WALL•E seems to be the subject of Simpson’s dream sequences as of late. Maybe it has to do with Jim Reardon’s involvement in both projects…

You may remember back in late 2008, Upcoming Pixar posted a clip of Homer’s post-apocalyptic nightmare involving a WALL-E-esque character and an unfortunate lack of honey. Also, not too long ago, the show parodied Carl’s house from Up.

Are you a fan of The Simpsons? What do you think of the show’s latest nod to Pixar and its body of characters?

(Thanks, lennonluvr9/via TrekMovie.com)

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Fake WALL-E Atari 2600 Cover = Awesome!

WALL-E

Posted by Thomas • February 8, 2010

Penney Design, a freelance graphic designer, has created the coolest mockup Atari 2600 cover mockups.

They have taken modern movies and TV shows, and made up the cover as if they were in the 1970’s. WALL-E gets included (click to view larger) in the cover selection ranging from The Dark Knight to Lost.

Be sure to have a look at the others.

(via Collider)

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Pixar Memorabilia Auctions to Benefit Haiti [UPDATE X3]

A Bug's Life, Auction, Cars, Charity, Lee Unkrich, Merchandise, Monsters, Inc., Pixar, Poster, Ratatouille, Toy Story, Toy Story 2, Toy Story 3, WALL-E

Posted by Thomas • January 23, 2010

Toy Story 3 Woody Poster Signed by Tom HanksEver wanted to get your dirty mits on original gear from a Pixar director’s own private collection?

How about an original 1995 Buzz Action Figure signed by Tim Allen or perhaps even a Toy Story 3 poster signed by a cast member? Well today is your lucky day!

Toy Story 3 director, Lee Unkrich, is hosting a series of auctions on eBay for you to score this insanely cool Pixar gear. All of the proceeds from each of these auctions benefits the Clinton Bush Haiti Fund

Update: New items added, finished auctions removed!
Here is what you can currently bid on:

Cars Joe Ranft Storyboard Print Crew Gift
Ratatouille Vintage-Inspired Poster Crew Gift
The Incredibles Teddy Newton Artwork Print Crew Gift
Lee’s Personal The Incredibles Hawaiian Shirt
Finding Nemo Submarine Voyage Disneyland Poster
The Art of The Incredibles Signed By Brad Bird
The Incredibles Screenplay Signed By Brad Bird
Monsters, Inc. Original 2001 Crew T-Shirt
Monsters, Inc. 2001 Mug Signed By Pete Docter
Monsters, Inc. 2001 Lunchbox Signed By Pete Docter
Original Tin Toy Pixar T-Shirt From 1988
Toy Story 1995 SIGGRAPH T-Shirt
Toy Story Original 1995 Crew Shirt
WALL•E Original 2008 Crew Jacket (BnL Edition)
WALL•E Crew Baseball Cap
Monsters, Inc. Hawaiian Shirt
Monsters, Inc. Boxers Worn By Chimp In DVD Featurettes
Monsters, Inc. Picture Book Signed By Ricky Nierva (2, 3)
Up Crew Leather Satchel
Toy Story 2 Jessie Doll Signed By John Lasseter

Lee Unkrich's Personal 2008 Original WALL-E Crew JacketGet your bids in quickly!
Check out past items at this archived post.

These are amazing once-in-a-lifetime offers, and not only will you be getting a cool piece of certified Pixar memorabillia, but you will also be helping people very much in need in Haiti.

Update 2: Lee Unkrich’s auction has raised over $13,000 dollars for Haiti so far! New items added above.

Update 3: Now the tally has gone up to $20,000 dollars raised! Keep helping Haiti, new items added.

That’s it for today! Be sure to stay tuned to Lee’s Twitter feed next week when he posts more signed stuff.

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Best of the Decade Lists + Pixar

Cars, Finding Nemo, Monsters, Inc., Pixar, Ratatouille, The Incredibles, UP, WALL-E

Posted by Martin • January 2, 2010

Originally, I was aiming for this post to be online before the decade ended. But, due to some unexpected circumstances, that deadline was not possible.

Anyway, here is a list of end of the decade honors for each Pixar movie released between the years 2000 and 2009.

Monsters, Inc. (2001): Collider #2 along with all below, TimesNews.net unranked w/ all below, Metacritic #90

Finding Nemo (2003): The Washington Post #1, Daily Mail #18, Metacritic #41, Orlando Sentinel unranked, Austin 360 unranked

The Incredibles (2004): Daily Mail UK #4, Metacritic #12, Times Online #16, Flicks New Zealand #31, The Star-Ledger unranked, Rotten Tomatoes unranked

Cars (2006): Pixar Planet’s Special Mention

Ratatouille (2007): At the Movies #2, Metacritic #3, Paste Magazine #32, Daily Mail #37

WALL•E (2008): At the Movies #1, The Dallas Morning News #2, Entertainment Weekly #5, IMDb #8, Metacritic #8, JournalStar.com #12, Flicks New Zealand #20, Oklahoma Daily #39, The Canadian Press unranked

Up (2009): Film School Rejects #13, Oklahoma Daily #13, Paste Magazine #14, IMDb #15, Metacritic #54

Remember, these are rankings out of the thousands of movies released in the past 10 years, so landing on a list at all is HUGE. As an added bonus, here’s a collection featuring Best of 2009 lists that include Pixar’s 10th film, Up.

Up — Best of 2009: Chicago Tribune #1, Epoch Times #1, All Headline News #1TIME Magazine #2, Paste Magazine #2, Entertainment Weekly #2, The Associated Press #5, National Post #8, The New Yorker unranked

Thanks to Pixar Talk for their laborious collection of lists in their news round-ups throughout the last couple of weeks. It helped in the making of this post.

Let us know of any other lists mentioning Pixar that we might have missed by commenting below. While you’re doing that, tell us what your favorite film(s) of the decade was/were, Pixar or otherwise.

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