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Check Out The New Poster for Coco!

Coco, Lee Unkrich, Poster

Posted by Nia • March 13, 2017

Lee Unkrich, the director of Coco, released a brand new poster for the upcoming film on Friday:

The poster is colorful and heaps of fun, as it depicts one of the characters of the film, Dante – a hairless Mexican dog, otherwise known as a Xoloitzcuintle. It’s also hard not to notice the character being playfully pet by a skeleton whilst what appears to be glowing flower petals float away to the left.

And yes… you certainly read that correctly! We will finally be seeing a trailer for Unkrich’s second feature film THIS week. Seriously, we can hardly wait.

Coco is set to be released this November.

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New poster and cast revealed for Cars 3

Cars 3

Posted by Simoa • March 10, 2017

A stunning new poster with incredible detail has been unveiled for Cars 3.

The water is especially gorgeous as rendered on the poster. We can expect more breathtaking shots in the film, as its one of the most complex things to animate. Cruz Ramirez is also present on this poster, her first. And a gritty Jackson Storm takes up the rear.

The original cast will be returning for the third installment, along with the NASA racers who were announced last month. The new voices include some well known names.

Kerry Washington makes her Disney-Pixar debut as Natalie Certain, who she describes as a “super-smarty-pants statistician. She reminds of a statistical analyst on cable news or SportsCenter. She knows everything there is to know about the ins and outs of statistics when it comes to racing.”

Nathan Fillion also joins the cast as Sterling.

Definitely the most interesting addition is Miss Fritter, voiced by Lea Delaria.

Images and quotes here obtained by People magazine.

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Dream Team: Pixar and NASCAR

Cars 3, NASCAR

Posted by Simoa • February 23, 2017

How excited is everyone for Cars 3? My anticipation for the film has been mounting ever since the first teaser dropped and every new bit of footage and news is cause for more excitement. If you’re like me, you may be thrilled to learn about NASCAR’s involvement with the upcoming film.

Chase Elliot and Jeff Gordon, who voiced Jeff Gorvette in Cars 2.

A handful of drivers will be lending to their voices in the film, as reported on nascar.com! For the racing cars enthusiasts out there, this cast includes Chase Elliott, Ryan Blaney, Daniel Suárez, and Bubba Wallace. They’ll be joining Darrell Waltrip, Jeff Gordon and Richard Petty who have previously voiced characters in the Cars films.

But Pixar isn’t just retaining a roster of NASCAR drivers for the voice cast.

The initiative goes beyond merely lending voices to the sequel, but stretches to at-track appearances, merchandise and co-branded learning materials for elementary school students through the NASCAR Acceleration Nation youth program. But the movie’s story arc also draws parallels from NASCAR’s current trend, of a growing youth movement that’s making its mark in its regional and national series.

This new collaboration will have its official debut at the Daytona 500 on February 26th, with Lightning McQueen himself, Owen Wilson, appearing as grand marshal.

Cars 3 races into theaters on June 16th.

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Here’s Your First Look at Lou – The Short to Play in Front of Cars 3

Cars 3, Dave Mullins, Lou, Short Film

Posted by Nia • February 2, 2017

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Since last year we’ve known that Lou was a new short being developed by Pixar, but we didn’t know when it would be premiering or much about the story – aside from the fact it focused on a lost-and-found box and would be directed by Dave Mullins.

Yesterday the studio released more information regarding the short and that it will be playing in front of this year’s film, Cars 3.

The short, in the usual Pixar fashion, will be centered on Lou, a hidden creature in a lost-and-found box at a school. The creature, created from mismatched baseballs and a beaten red hoodie, watches the school children play and secretly protects them against the local bully, J.J.

From a USA Today interview, Mullins discussed that the inspiration for this short was his childhood and the fact he never spent much of his time in one place as a kid.

“You either feel invisible because you don’t know the other kids or you’re embarrassed and you want to be invisible. I thought it’d be really cool to have a character who could hide in plain sight.”

Since Lou’s main motivation is to protect the other children in the school and give back to those who need it the most, he felt J.J. being a bully would help push the story forward while making it relatable to everyone.

“They’re usually just acting out because they’re awkward or young and don’t have their moral compass set. In a weird way, the bullies sometimes feel invisible, too. If you can find out what their motivations are, maybe you can solve some things. That’s what I like about Lou: True happiness comes from giving, He gets J.J. to understand that and through that, what J.J. wants really is to be accepted by the other kids.”

You can catch Lou on the big screen this summer in front of Cars 3.

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Samuel L. Jackson Is Just As Excited About The Incredibles 2 As We Are

Brad Bird, The Incredibles, The Incredibles 2

Posted by Nia • December 17, 2016

Well it’s confirmed, Samuel L. Jackson AKA Mr. Frozone himself will be returning to the Incredibles 2.

It's about to go down… First recording session for…. INCREDIBLES 2!!!!

A post shared by Samuel L Jackson (@samuelljackson) on

 

From his recent Instagram post, its obvious he is just as thrilled as the fans that the sequel is coming to theaters soon. It was teased in the past, from Jackson himself, that Frozone would return in the second installment. From a Digital Spy interview back in 2014: “Every time I run into Brad Bird, he always tells me Frozone is part of what’s going on, so I have to believe that. I guess they could be the Incredibles without Frozone, but I think Frozone would be a wonderful addition to what’s already there.” We truly hope that we will get even more screen time from Frozone. Who knows what he’s been up to since coming out of retirement to help the Parr family. Let’s hope his wife has kept his super-suit at the ready. The Incredibles 2 will be smashing into theaters June 15, 2018.

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New Disney/Pixar Gallery Nucleus Exhibition Opens in Los Angeles

30 Years of Pixar, A Bug's Life, Art, Cars, Cars 2, Finding Dory, Finding Nemo, Inside Out, John Lasseter, Monsters University, Monsters, Inc., Ratatouille, The Incredibles, Toy Story, Toy Story 2, Toy Story 3, WALL-E

Posted by Nia • December 10, 2016

Have you ever wanted to see some of your favorite artwork from Pixar films in real life? Fear no more, as a new exhibition has just opened up at Gallery Nucleus in LA today. For the first time ever, the gallery will be showcasing brand new images from each of Pixar’s feature films. What makes it even more unique is that John Lasseter himself picked each design for the show. There will also be hand-signed limited edition prints for sale by each artist who worked on the pieces.

Thanks to Oh My Disney for providing the artwork that will be featured at the showcase.

By Bob Pauley

By Bob Pauley

 

By Tia Kratter

By Tia Kratter

 

By Randy Barret

By Randy Barret

 

By Pete Docter

By Pete Docter

 

By Ralph Eggleston

By Ralph Eggleston

 

By Teddy Newton

By Teddy Newton

 

By Bill Cone

By Bill Cone

 

By Dominique Louis

By Dominique Louis

 

By Ralph Eggleston

By Ralph Eggleston

 

By Lou Romano

By Lou Romano

 

By Robert Kondo

By Robert Kondo

 

By Harley Jessup

By Harley Jessup

 

By Steve Pilch

By Steve Pilch

 

By Rickey Nierva

By Rickey Nierva

 

By Ralph Eggleston

By Ralph Eggleston

 

By Sharon Calahan

By Sharon Calahan

 

By Daniel L Munoz

By Daniel L Munoz

 

Be sure to check out Galley Nucleus and celebrate the art of Pixar if you’re in town – it runs from today, December 10th to January 8th, 2017.

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To Pixar and Beyond giveaway winners

Giveaway

Posted by Simoa • November 22, 2016

Today marks 21 years of Toy Story! We’re thrilled to be gifting three lucky readers with a copy of To Pixar and Beyond, which delves into the history of the film and its unprecedented success.

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Congratulations to Sean McCann, Jen Taylor, and Nicole! To claim the book, simply email me (elliefredricksen@pixarplanet.com) for further instructions. Please email me on or before November 26th. If you have not by that date, we will choose another reader.

Thanks to everyone who participated!

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Book review: To Pixar and Beyond

Lawrence Levy, Review, Steve Jobs, To Pixar and Beyond, Toy Story

Posted by Simoa • November 16, 2016

to-pixar-and-beyond-by-lawrence-levy-book-cover-200x3002x“Art challenges the technology, and the technology inspires the art.”

But what about business? In his new book, To Pixar and Beyond: My Unlikely Journey with Steve Jobs to Make Entertainment History, Lawrence Levy sheds a light on the business side of Pixar and how the studio emerged as a renowned name while he served as its Chief Financial Officer. With rich clarity and detail, Levy recounts Pixar’s humble beginnings and astronomical success, his relationship with Steve Jobs, and the practical lessons other leaders can implement to make their own companies flourish.

Pixar was never an overnight success. In fact, when Levy was recruited by Steve Jobs in 1994, success was a mere word, not a tangible outcome. For 16 years the company floundered, after Jobs’ original plans for the Pixar Computer failed. Levy was understandably reluctant to join this small company with both a complicated past and a murky future. Originally located in Point Richmond, California, even its office was dreary and unimpressive. There was nothing to suggest that this was a studio worth investing in.

And then Levy watched the first clip of Toy Story and the rest was history.

Well, not quite. Toy Story‘s impact on Levy was profound. He realized that Pixar was going to change animation. “Pixar was embarked on a lonely, courageous quest through terrain into which neither it nor anyone else had ever ventured.” While he was moved by the passion of John Lasseter and had confidence in Lasseter’s vision, as well as Ed Catmull’s, he also expressed reservations about joining them. Pixar represented too great of a business risk. There was awe inspiring vision, but nothing to ground it. When Levy did eventually sign on, he remained wary, but he also remained awed over Toy Story‘s emotional power.

The highest priority for Steve Jobs was taking the company public. This was nearly impossible since the studio’s lack of success wouldn’t attract investors. Finding investors was a grueling process. But when Pixar did secure backers, it was on the strength of its vision for computer animation. Taking such a risk proved enormously rewarding: Toy Story was the biggest film of 1995 upon its release, grossing $192 million. Pixar’s market value totaled $1.5 billion. The studio was no longer a failed Steve Jobs endeavor, but a new and striking force within the animation industry.

Even as Pixar’s success rate continued its ascent, neither Levy nor the creative team grew too comfortable. He wisely notes that success changes an individual. The goal was always to take risks with the films, and they were allowed to do just that, without executive meddling. Such was Levy and Jobs’ commitment to preserving Pixar’s creative spirit along with its financial security.

Even if the world of finances, business and stocks is alien to the reader, To Pixar and Beyond is a thoroughly engaging and fascinating read. This is attributed to Lawrence Levy’s personable and warm tone. A deep sense of humility characterizes his reflections. This book is an excellent resource for anyone who wishes to learn more about Pixar’s history and the overlooked people responsible for its breakthrough success. Levy also makes a case for how necessary practicality is to a company like Pixar. Just as technology can be wedded to art, so too can business.

We are also giving away a copy of the book to three lucky readers! To enter, simply comment on this post and tell us who your favorite Toy Story character is. We will announce the winners on November 22nd, which is also the film’s 21st anniversary!

To learn more about the book and author, please visit lawrencelevy.com.

UPDATE: this giveaway is now closed.

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The Incredibles 2 Is Blasting Into Cinemas Earlier Than Expected

Brad Bird, John Lasseter, The Incredibles, The Incredibles 2, Toy Story 4

Posted by Nia • October 27, 2016

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It appears the animation Gods are favoring all fans of The Incredibles this week. It was discovered yesterday that The Incredibles 2 will now be released a whole year early, as opposed to it’s original 2019 slot. This is the best news possible for anyone who has been counting down the days to the film’s release after the original announcement, which itself feels like many moons ago. The Incredibles 2 is blasting through the production pipeline and only means great things surrounding the storytelling aspects. We suppose the Parr family are just incredibly excited to finally team up and hit cinemas again. The sequel to the 2004 hit switched places with Toy Story 4, and will now be released on June 15th, 2018. The bad news is that Toy Story 4, for the second time, is now pushed back and scheduled to be released on June 21st, 2019. Despite Toy Story 4 feeling like it’s stuck in production limbo, it most certainly makes us want to do cartwheels around the office knowing we’re going to be reunited with the Parr family sooner than expected.

Stay-tuned for more updates on the film.

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Finding Dory Press Junket Exclusive

Andrew Stanton, Angus Maclane, Behind The Scenes, Finding Dory, Finding Nemo, Interview

Posted by Nia • June 17, 2016

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Last week Upcoming Pixar was invited to a Finding Dory press junket in Beverly Hills. There we got to see the fantastic cast of the film discuss their experiences while working on the project. The room was buzzing with excitement as the cast walked on stage. After watching a screening the night before at the Walt Disney Studios, we were excited to have a few hours set aside to hear about the making of the film and find out more about the new worlds depicted. It was certainly thrilling to get an opportunity to be in the same room as some of the talented folks apart of this film, ask them questions, and hear first hand about their time channelling their characters. The cast in attendance consisted of Albert Brooks, Hayden Rolence, Eugene Levy, Kaitlin Olson, Ty Burrell, Ed O’Neill, and of course, Ellen DeGeneres.

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Every cast member on stage contributed something wonderful and added to the story of Dory trying to find her parents. The junket was structured in a way where the audience members were able to ask questions to anyone on stage, which opened up some insightful inquiries. The cast was also very playful during the questions and were quick to bounce back for any comedic opportunities.

Some of our favorite moments: 

  • Ed O’Neill offered some light on his beloved new character Hank, the octopus. One of his major character quirks in Finding Dory was that he’s missing a tentacle and he’s desperately trying to find a way out of the aquarium. He refuses to go back in the ocean and O’Neill offered that reason is because “he had a bad experience in the ocean. We’re guessing that something bit off one of his tentacles.”
  • When asked how the cast prepared for their roles, Ty Burrell mentioned how he had created a distinct voice that he thought would match the character perfectly. He wanted to channel the character like “a whale with a cold” since Bailey looked rather congested. After pitching the idea and voicing a few lines, Andrew Stanton politely insisted on Burrell doing “the whole film in his voice” rather than the fun little voice he had created. Albert Brooks pitched in that he kept his co-star Hayden Rolence, who voiced Nemo, “in a small tank for six months” as inspiration.
  • Ellen discussed that if she were to have any trait from Dory, she’d want to have all of them. “I try to have as many traits as she has: optimism, perseverance, non-judgement, not having any resentment, or holding on to anger, not feeling like a victim; I think that’s why she’s such a lovable character because she really thinks everything is possible. She never for a second thinks that anything is wrong with anybody else or herself. She just keeps swimming.”
  • Albert Brooks’ new philosophy to life was revealed, after he was asked if he solves problems more analytically like Marlin or spontaneously like Dory: “Thank God my memory is great. As you get older, you do forget little things. I’ve come up now with a new philosophy of life: if something is bothering me, I ask myself to check back in 30 minutes. If it’s still bothering me, I deal with it; but a lot of it I don’t remember.”
  • Eugene Levy’s secret to being a great movie dad is “acting.”
  • Destiny and Bailey’s relationship in Finding Dory is more focused on them being like siblings rather than best friends or a married couple. “They’re really very close, but they annoy the heck out of each other. I feel there’s a theme in this film where Destiny can’t see very well, Bailey’s radar is all messed up, and Dory can’t remember but somehow friendship can make you complete. Their relationship in the institute was sort of about that, them trying to take care of each other. It’s creating your own kind of family.”
  • And finally, we even got to ask Ellen a question! “You’ve helped shape Dory’s personality from the very beginning in Finding Nemo, did you have a particular connection with Dory’s desire for belonging and finding her family?” And Ellen’s response: “Well I think everybody is searching for their home, whatever that is, I think home is different for everybody. I understand what a sense of belonging is, I understand when you want to say ‘why am I who I am?’, ‘where did I come from’, and ‘how did I end up where I am?’ Yeah, I can relate to that. I think everybody can.”

In a previous conference that same day, director Andrew Stanton and producer Lindsey Collins shared some fabulous insight on how they were able to successfully revisit the world of Finding Nemo and also some of the obstacles they faced in production.

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Some of our favorite moments:

  • It was in 2011, when Andrew Stanton was watching the 3D release of Finding Nemo, that he left “very worried about Dory and couldn’t stop thinking about how she needed closure”, thus sparking the idea to delve into a sequel. Andrew and Lindsay Collins kept that idea to themselves for a while, until they were 100% sure they wanted to re-visit the world and Dory, and perfect the story. “Once you say ‘Finding Anything’ they’re going to want to make it.”
  • Andrew Stanton’s song choices (Beyond The Sea and Unforgettable) in both Finding Nemo and Finding Dory were thematic. It was Robbie Williams singing a version of Beyond The Sea that inspired him to go the route of choosing a classic song but with a twist for the end of his films.
  • Andrew’s new favorite character is Hank because he’s spent the most time with him, in terms of working with O’Neill during the records and dealing with all the technicalities with the character in production. Lindsay Collins loves Bailey and Destiny.
  • A normal character in a Pixar film takes six months, but it took two years to make Hank. “It took six months just to animate the first shot with him. We would still be making the movie right now had we not learned how to do that a little faster.”
  • Stanton’s goal for Dory was to be universal with Dory’s disability, “I was using her disability to represent everybody. It works for anybody, because nobody is perfect. Everybody has a flaw that they maybe mislabel as such. It’s a reflection of my age. I’ve reached middle-age and you start to recognize that I’m not really going to change. I am who I am, and I got to own that. I’ve got to learn to start enjoying that fact; the good and the bad.”
  • The environment in both films have different meanings. In Finding Nemo, the vast ocean that Marlin and Dory traveled through was more like a desert. In the sequel, Andrew decided to have it set near the aquarium because he wanted more of a forest setting he couldn’t explore in the first film. “It’s more like a forest, a fairy tale. In fairy tales things are hidden, secrets are hidden there, and things are discovered in the forest.”

It’s always inspiring listening to the filmmakers and cast talk firsthand about how they were able to collaborate and create such a fantastic film. Many thanks to the cast and crew for their time during the junket, and Disney/Pixar for letting us have the opportunity to be there.

It’s highly recommended that you check out Finding Dory, which is finally released in cinemas today. We hope you’re as excited as we were to check out the film. And always remember… just keep swimming!

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