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Pixar Receives Three Golden Globe Nominations

Golden Globes, Loop, Onward, Soul

Posted by Simoa • February 3, 2021

Happy 35th birthday to our favorite animation studio! One aspect of Pixar’s legacy is award winning films. They’ve won numerous Oscars and Golden Globes. These awards will soon air (virtually we assume), and nominations for the Globes were announced today. Onward and Soul were both nominated for Best Animated Feature, along with a Best Score nomination for Soul as well.

A SparkShort was also recognized. “Loop” was nominated for an NAACP Image Award in the Outstanding Short Form (Animated) category, the first Pixar film to receive the honor. The short, unlike a certain Golden Globe nominated film, actually hired an autistic actress for the lead, and was both authentic and respectful in its portrayal. I’m so glad “Loop” is being recognized by the NAACP!

Congratulations to the crew of Onward and Soul! The Golden Globes will air on February 28, 2021.

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Soul – Something To Look Forward To

Pete Docter, Soul

Posted by Joanna • December 21, 2020

We can all agree that this year has been an exceptionally weird one. Usually, the run-up to the year end’s festivities is cause for excitement, and while I – like countless others – will be happy to see the back of 2020, I can’t say that I’m exactly ‘looking forward’ to what 2021 might bring. Christmas, New Year and beyond are all clouded in uncertainty.

One thing about Christmas that is certain is we’ll be able to watch Soul, and Burrow (the short that was supposed to precede it in theatres).

Pixar have done a really profound thing by releasing Soul on Disney+ on Christmas Day. Not only are its themes – chasing dreams and celebrating life – a wonderful reminder of what lies ahead for all of us, but it’s given us something to look forward to. December 25th may be full of doubt and worry for a lot of people this year, but the release of Soul is something we can count on to bring people together.

We were lucky enough to attend a digital press conference for Soul earlier this year, and it was inspiring to be in the (virtual) company of such talented filmmakers, producers, and actors. Pete Docter revealing a lovely sketch of the interviewer right before the conference ended may have been the highlight. He’d been secretly working on it throughout the conference.

Soul is something to look forward to this festive season. We’ll leave you with some facts we learnt during the press conference that will hopefully help make the thought of Christmas a little easier for some of you.

 

1. The counsellors in The Great Before are based on simple, twisted wires

The Great Before is where all souls are formed and shaped before they’re ready to move on to Earth. Pete Docter remarked “We figured if the souls just ran amok, no one would ever get born. It would just be bedlam up there. So they need a little bit of steering.”

That’s where the counsellors come in! They almost take on the role of kindergarten teachers. They’re totally unique looking – very different from the design of the individual souls, and very different from humans too. The Great Before could be described as quite ‘minimalistic’ and abstract, and the counsellors fit right in with that aesthetic. They’re based off of wire models shaped slightly to resemble a human face, but just wait until you see how they’re animated! It’s mesmerising. They’re apparently one of the most tricky character designs that Pixar has faced yet. Also – they’re pretty much all called Jerry.

©2020 Disney/Pixar. All rights reserved.

 

2. The settings in The Great Before had some unusual inspirations

Because the world of souls is suitably very abstract and philosophical, it was difficult to settle on a ‘look’ for The Great Before. The filmmakers tried taking inspiration from Ancient Greece, but that ended up being too “culturally specific” – The Great Before needed to be more universal. So they turned to – World’s Fair photos from the 1940s! Of course. It does kind of make sense though: it’s abstract, timeless, and borrows from all sorts of different cultures.

1939 New York World’s Fair – Image by © CORBIS

 

3. How Pixar made sure their first movie featuring a black protagonist was authentic

Soul wasn’t always going to be about a jazz musician. They wanted a passionate lead who was figuring out what to do with his life and how to pursue his dreams. Joe was a scientist, an artist, and an actor before they settled on jazz. And once they knew he was going to play jazz – music that originated from black communities in New Orleans – they realised he had to be black.

Kemp Powers and a whole team of other consultants were brought on board to make sure the film was as authentic as possible. And this was absolutely the right move – Soul oozes authenticity. Black employees at Pixar were also brought together to create a trust and were involved in the making of the film at every step.

Kemp Powers recalled that when Pixar first asked him for his involvement, he pointed out:

“You know that I’m gonna be pushing for, like, a lot of black stuff. Because I can’t help myself … our culture is amazing. And, a lot of people, particularly in Hollywood, will tell you that, in order to appeal to a wide audience, you want to get away from that. And I feel the opposite. I feel, like, there is universality by going for the hyper-specificity.”

© 2020 Disney/Pixar. All rights reserved.

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Soul Could Be The Best Thing To Come Out Of 2020

Review, Soul

Posted by Joanna • December 8, 2020

Pixar movies have this magical quality to them. They somehow manage to present themselves in our lives at just the right time – it’s amazing how current and relevant they reliably are despite being in production for years beforehand. Soul is no exception. In fact, it might be the most ‘timely’ Pixar movie yet. (Ironic, given the fact that it’s been delayed multiple times due to COVID-19).

This is an important point to make, though: the one way that Soul is not ‘timely’ is that it’s the first Pixar movie to feature a Black protagonist at the centre of its story. This didn’t come at the ‘perfect time’. This was long overdue.

In every other regard, though, Soul has arrived exactly on time. It’s a top tier Pixar movie for a multitude of reasons, but most powerfully because of how hard it hits in the year 2020.

 

First off – the look and sound of Soul is…full of soul, unsurprisingly.

At this point, you’d think we would have stopped being surprised by how beautiful Pixar movies continue to be. But you will absolutely gasp at so many scenes in Soul, at how much of a marvel they are. And not in a “wow I can’t believe how real this looks” way – there are parts of Soul that have unreal beauty. This movie shows you places that you would never see outside of your wildest imagination – ‘The Great Before’, and astral planes – but it also shows you places that are immediately familiar and recognisable. The streets of New York City feel so authentic – they’re realised with such a sense of joy and vibrancy. And the diversity of character designs is such a delight.

©2020 Disney/Pixar

©2020 Disney/Pixar

©2020 Disney/Pixar

This mastery of recreating the real world and creating new worlds from scratch was vital in bringing Soul’s story to life. Joe Gardner, an aspiring jazz pianist, is suddenly plunged into the afterlife on the very day his dream career seemed to finally be coming together. Feeling that his life was only just starting, he needs to fight his way back to Earth and avoid having to move on into ‘The Great Beyond’.

As with Pixar’s 2017 film Coco, music plays a huge role in the plot and themes of Soul, so it’s appropriate that it’s been treated and represented so passionately. Coco’s guitar playing sequences are breath-taking – the way the animation captured the intricate fingering is incredible. Soul achieved this impressive feat again and more. Joe’s piano-playing sequences feel so raw and wonderfully observed. Dorothea Williams playing the saxophone is mesmerising.

The soundtrack is also fittingly soulful – a magical mix of Jon Batiste’s jazz and Reznor and Ross’ otherworldly modern tracks.

©2020 Disney/Pixar

 

Soul – the best thing to come out of the year 2020?

Soul gives us an imaginative insight into what happens when we die, but it is a film about life. It’s strangely ironic that a film that so confidently celebrates life has had to face so many delays due to the year 2020. The pandemic has forced people to ‘put their lives on hold’ until we can get back to actually living and ‘fulfilling our purposes’ again. But this is why I feel Soul couldn’t have come about at a better time. When I say that Soul is a movie about life, I mean life in its simplest essence. It’s not about life’s complexity, or its milestones or hurdles. Soul celebrates just…living. Watching the sky. Going for walks. Feeling the wind on your face. In a year where so much has been stripped away from us, it’s so wonderful that Soul has reminded us to find joy in the little things.

©2020 Disney/Pixar

Soul comes to Disney+ on December 25th. Whether you’re with family or friends, physically or virtually, or even on your own – I hope Soul brings a smile to your face this Christmas. It’s a bold reminder of how much we have to look forward to, and how much we can appreciate in the present.

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The language of the soul

Soul, Soul press day

Posted by Simoa • December 1, 2020

Music transcends all sorts of barriers: language, distance, and culture. Music connects us through all of those things as well. When Soul‘s filmmakers were creating the character of Joe Gardner, they had to think of a profession that would elicit sympathy from the audience. They settled on a musician. They also knew that this musician would have to be Black, as jazz was invented, shaped, and pioneered by Black artists. Musicians are passionate artists, just like painters, writers, and sculptors. Soul is going to ask some big questions about the meaning of life and a life lived passionately is one lived well.

There’s a scene in the film that perfectly captures a moment of inspiration – being in “the zone.” It’s during Joe’s audition with the Dorothea Williams quartet. He becomes so immersed in the piece he’s playing that everything and everyone melts away. It’s just him and the song, swathed in vivid colors. It called to mind the paint strokes of the “Colors of the Wind” sequence in Pocahontas. Only an artist could be the protagonist of a story like this. Animation is not the only medium to tell this kind of story – see It’s a Wonderful Life (1946) – but it is the only medium that can portray moments like the one in Soul in such an innovative way. Being “swept away” can actually be literal in an animated film.

Inspiration also came from a video that featured jazz legend Herbie Hancock. In it, he related a story about playing with the Miles Davis, and how he messed up a note. Hancock was mortified, but Davis was able to use that note. In Pete Docter’s words:

“Not only a great story, but really a perfect metaphor for what we were talking about in the film. Don’t judge. Take what you’re given. Turn it into something of value. We realized that jazz was really the perfect representation of what we were trying to say in the film.”

Jon Batiste was brought on to compose the film’s jazz score. Batiste has an enthusiasm that’s truly infectious. He described Soul as having a lot of light force energy. He needed to create music that would mimic the film’s ethereal essence. Some of his pieces have an optimistic and melancholy sound. His own personality and energy definitely inspired the film’s sound. Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross were also brought onboard to compose the music for the Great Before, leading to a surprisingly cohesive meld of that world and New York’s jazzy scene.

Batiste explains:

“…it really complements what Trent and Atticus came up with, and the times in the film when our music comes together, when the worlds kinda collide, it’s amazing how it worked out. And it really changed the rest of the music that I was composing for the film because I got a chance to see into their process, and that also leaked into the kind of spiritual tone that I’m talkin’ about, this ethos that we created.”

Batiste also described that pivotal scene when Joe as a teenager falls in love with jazz the first time. Like the audition scene, the vivid purple lights are dancing and illuminating his face. He likened it to a Kenny Kirkland or Branford Marsalis record from the 70s or 80s. These are musicians I’ve never heard of, but Batiste was able to incorporate his favorites into the music.

Like Miguel playing the guitar in Coco, one of the challenges for animators was accurate piano playing for Joe. Reference videos of Batiste was one source (even if his hands were often flying around the keys!). The animators were responsible for inspecting the hand movements and finger articulation. That was their visual cue which then had to be animated by frame. Time consuming of course, but ultimately worth it. A million details will go unnoticed by the audience, which is the goal, but for any musicians watching, it should look just right.

Music has always been an integral part of Pixar’s films. Of course Michael Giacchino’s Up score is one of the most iconic, along with Wall-E‘s. In our post covid world, we can’t go to concerts. But Soul is bringing the music to us. I would like to share more of Jon Batiste’s words about Pixar’s lovely Christmas gift.

“I’m so happy that the word is getting out about the film and people are finally gonna see it. And people need light in this time, and I’m all about bringing the light, and that’s one of the great pleasures of working with Pixar. They’ve created these films that delve into all of the cultures of the world and create it in a way that’s accessible to all people. It doesn’t matter where you’re from or what your experience. The stories transcend all of that.”

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Animating Soul with life, colors, and lines

Art, Behind The Scenes, Soul, Soul press day

Posted by Simoa • November 4, 2020

Soul is all about the essence of a person. In most religions, like mine for example (Catholicism), the soul lives on after death. We also believe that our souls will one day be reunited with our bodies. A person’s soul will either go to Heaven (an eternity of holy bliss), Purgatory (a purification process before reaching Heaven), or the dreaded Hell (an eternity of unholy agony).

I know these beliefs are strange, but that’s precisely why I am fascinated by Soul. This is one of the reasons Coco resonated with me so much, too. We pray for all of our dead, the ones we knew and loved, and even those we didn’t. We can’t forget them, as Coco so beautifully showed us.

Soul is not about the afterlife, though we do get a brief glimpse of the Great Beyond. That’s where souls journey after death in this film’s universe. Small wonder then that Joe is terrified of this unknown, the end of his Earthly life, and starts running in the other direction, where he lands – poof!- into an entirely different realm. In direct contrast to that monochrome expanse, this place, the Great Before, is a pastel dreamscape, filled with soft hues of blue, green, and purple. It is here that newly formed souls get their personalities, quirks, and interests.

Soul Matter

What does a soul look like? That was one of the major challenges on this film. I’ve always pictured them as a red plume, like a candle flame. (Maybe a bit Calcifer esque)? After a few trial runs, the souls looked too much like ghosts. Producer Dana Murray mentioned that they overcame this hurdle by adding color: “If souls represent the full potential of who we are inside, maybe we could use color to help show that.”

The film crew also discovered aerogel, the lightest solid material on Earth, which is used by NASA. The aerogel helped with the appearance and texture of the souls. The result is simple but not at all simplistic. Usually it’s the most simple things that require a fair amount of effort and brain power. Souls are immaterial and abstract, but the Pixar artists infused them with whimsicality. Now this abstract concept becomes more accessible with lots of childlike appeal.

There were more things to consider as well. Newer souls are very smooth and float because they have no concept of gravity. Mentor souls are those who are not quite ready to pass over to the Great Beyond, so they are assigned a new soul to guide before they reach Earth. This is how Joe gets paired up with 22. Mentors, unlike the new souls, have discernible features and accessories. In Joe’s case, his hat and glasses help to distinguish him. The mentors walk around because they’re so accustomed to gravity, although they don’t need to.

22 is different from the newer souls: she has a tuft of hair, bigger teeth, the ability to grow legs and walk, and an adult speaking voice. This is because she’s been in the Great Before a long time, and knows a lot about Earth. She’s outgrown the bounciness and sheer wonder of the baby souls. That was something I found so interesting during the virtual press event in September: a lot of thought informed these designs, things we can so easily take for granted.

Soul‘s art team also envisioned some complex design rules: appearing and disappearing limbs, facial features that moved anywhere on the face and big, expressive mouth shapes that took up the whole face. These design rules were first implemented in 2D animation tests. The technical directors accomplished another major feat by simplifying a process that was quite time consuming for the animators. Jude Brownbill explained that there were “facial lines that were hand animated to appear, disappear, and change thickness with each expression. TDs figured out how to automate these lines, helping to anchor the eyes and the mouth on the face, help keep them on model and appealing, and to provide clarity and extreme emotions like confusion, fear, and rage.”

A soul’s guide to the universe

Our universe is staggeringly incomprehensible. How exactly can you capture that vastness? Here’s how Pixar did it. 

It’s human nature to make sense of things and create order out of seeming chaos. Movies like Coco, Beetlejuice, A Guy Named Joe, and A Matter of Life and Death depict the afterlife being run just like a government agency. Soul has a similar system in place with its Counselors and You Seminar. Jerry, one of the Counselors, explains to Joe that everything he sees has been simplified enough for his tiny human brain to understand. The same must also be true for us contemplating the origins of each human life.

The Counselors presented another unique challenge for the artists and animators. The team was inspired by Swedish sculptures, nature, and light itself. And that is what they resemble: beams of light made physical. They are possibly the most striking thing about Soul, odd and ethereal all at once. I would love to see an entire film in this style.

So how were these gossamer thin characters designed? The Counselors are just a single line, but again, it’s deceptively simple on the surface.

Bobby Podesta remarked that they look like the easiest things to animate, but of course they weren’t. These are living lines. Wire sculptures were created to show how the Counselors looked from different angles and with various expressions.

We began exploring shapes, expressions, movements, and transitions, and the animators didn’t just animate a model. I mean, they animated a design, and you can see that here. The characters captured that sense of a living line, a piece of art in a form that was understandable, yet still ethereal. So, to achieve the sense of design within the animation, our animators had to draw on their backgrounds as artists to craft a visually stunning performance, and it’s that combination of being both an actor and an artist that raises the bar at Pixar to a level that we hope continues to exceed our audience’s expectations.

-Bobby Podesta

Seeing these lines in motion is truly astounding. Pixar never stays in the same spot. The artists are constantly pushing boundaries, so each new film contains something we’ve never seen before.

Below is more awe-inspiring artwork I’m so excited to share. Soul will premiere on Disney+ on December 25th.

 

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A new trailer (+ reviews) for Soul!

Soul, Trailer

Posted by Simoa • October 15, 2020

The reviews are in! Soul has captivated the critics following its premiere at the London Film Festival. It’s being hailed as Pixar’s “most existentially ambitious film,” one that will have adults sobbing “until their muscles ache,” and it’s going to nourish your own soul, too. After watching partial footage last month at the virtual press event, I wholeheartedly agree with everyone’s glowing reviews. And it’s made me, somehow, even more eager to see the rest. I’m also very encouraged by what Kaleem Aftab wrote on IndieWire:

Joe’s blackness isn’t relegated to a side issue; it’s baked into the essence of the character, and treated as a crucial aspect of his humanity. To this end, “Soul” manages to juggle the surreal humor of “Inside Out” in tandem with its most grounded, socially-conscious narrative ever, and it’s a real wonder to watch those ingredients congeal.

That certainly is just one more thing to look forward to. And though we still have to wait another two months to watch Soul, there is a brand new trailer to tide us over until then!

Soul will be streaming on Disney+ this Christmas.

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The journey of a soul – there and back again

Aphton Corbin, Kristen Lester, Michael Yates, Pete Docter, Pixar Employees, Soul, Soul press day

Posted by Simoa • October 9, 2020

A trip to Pixar was out of the question this year, due to COVID-19’s travel and gathering restrictions. It definitely was a bummer, although minor in the grand scheme of things. But even if I couldn’t visit the studio in person, I was able to talk to the filmmakers of Soul and learn about the film virtually. As always, I’m grateful for the opportunity to go behind the scenes.

Soul has been in production for five years, but the story has been with Pete Docter for a lifetime. It all began 23 years ago, when his son was born. Docter marveled at his newborn child’s personality.

“I thought your personality developed through your interaction with the world. And yet, it was pretty clear that we’re all born with a very unique, specific sense of who we are.”

Pixar movies so often create something out of nothing, dazzling worlds vibrant with color and detail. They are either places we’ve never been or can only imagine. Soul‘s Great Before surpasses anything we’ve seen before, since the artists at Pixar outdo themselves every time. But no matter how mesmerizing the look of a film is, the characters within should take precedence. Enter Joe Gardner.

Playwright Kemp Powers joined the production in 2018 to write the script and was made co-director. His script pages were brought to the story department, where the artists were tasked with drawing them. Story supervisor Kristen Lester led this process, with a team that included Michael Yates and Aphton Corbin. According to Lester, Powers’ script contained a lot of history and authenticity, which really helped to inform Joe’s backstory.

There was a staggering number of storyboards drawn for this film – 73,611 to be exact! Take a look at just two of them below. Absolutely stunning!

Of course, not all of the boards made it into the final film, but those discarded ideas were still vital in establishing Joe and his background. We know that he’s a middle school band teacher with more lofty aspirations of a career in jazz music. Joe’s never realized these dreams, and Michael Yates was concerned with why that was the case. Joe is a talented pianist without any delusions, so why wouldn’t he have found success? Yates thought about people he knew who hadn’t achieved their dreams and was able to envision the obstacles standing in Joe’s way. In each instance, Joe misses an audition because he’s helping out his family, friends, and students. Through these sketches, we learned that he’s a selfless person who put his dreams on hold.

The sketches and script were then boarded by Aphton Corbin. One of the sequences she worked on was Joe’s life in the Hall of You, an exhibit that showcases a person’s life on earth and their achievements. Corbin “imagined it as a dark space with moments of Joe’s life playing in beams of light that characters could walk through, kind of like a museum.” Joe’s is distinctly unimpressive, a series of unexciting moments combined with failures. From this vantage point, his life is disappointing. This was intentional, as Corbin explained:

“We wanted Joe’s Hall of You to feel more like an exhibit of his failures rather than his successes. We piled on rejection after rejection to build our case and placed the moments where he decided to become a band teacher at the end, so Joe falling down the manhole felt like the perfect coda to his sad life. It was our goal at this point to get the audience on Joe’s side. We wanted them to feel like he needed to return to his body to finish living his dream as a jazz musician.”

Corbin also included Joe’s first encounter with jazz, a moment where he discovers the passion that now defines his life. His face was the focus in that scene – it’s one of the most wonderful in the film’s trailer. Joe’s face is lit up with love and wonder, aglow in the colors from the jazz club. We all have moments like that in our lives, no?

The completed storyboards were then sent to editorial, where music was added. Editorial is where the story artists watch how their drawings come together for the overall film. They watched the entire film from beginning to end about eight times in Pixar’s theater.

Mainstream animated and live action films rarely feature nonwhite characters as the heroes of the story. Too often they’re shunted into supporting roles. Audiences hardly ever watch films with Black protagonists that they can relate to and root for. I think people will definitely see themselves reflected in Joe’s Hall of You as I could, a place where our failures and dim moments eat up all the spotlight.

For Pete Docter, making this film was less about failed dreams, but questioning his purpose. He’s directed acclaimed films and won numerous awards, but still the question nagged at him.

“Is this really what I’m supposed to be doing with my limited time on Earth? In fact, in darker days, around now, I wonder sometimes, is there any point to it? If I had a choice, would I decide to be born and come live?”

I was so shocked to hear him admit that. We’re usually discouraged from sharing such thoughts, but I think it’s a universal feeling, especially with a world that’s constantly in turmoil. And with 2020 going on record as possibly the most disastrous year ever, this film’s release could not be any more timely.

Who would want to live if they were given that choice? But Soul seeks to both answer that question and dispel the doubt that surrounds it. This is a journey we’re all going to take with Joe, by asking ourselves the same questions.

There’s still so much more that I learned about this stunning film. Stay tuned to read all about it! But in the meantime, delve into Joe’s world with more gorgeous artwork.

Soul will premiere exclusively on Disney+ on December 25. This is the third time the film has been pushed to a later date. Theatrical release dates are pending. Surely whenever pandemic restrictions are eased, audiences will have the opportunity to be dazzled by it on the big screen.

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Catch A Sneak Peek Of Soul – Tomorrow!

Pete Docter, Soul

Posted by Joanna • June 26, 2020

Pixar’s next film Soul, directed by Pete Docter and Kemp Powers, was originally set to release on June 19th. It will now be released on November 20th. Lots of ‘firsts’ have happened this year due to obvious reasons, so Soul is now Pixar’s first movie to be postponed not due to production delays but due to a…global health crisis. A lot of the marketing is clearly shifting to virtual means because of this too.

Tomorrow (June 27th), Essence Festival of Culture is hosting a virtual conversation with the team behind Soul. We’ll even be given an exclusive sneak peek at the film.

The team behind Disney & Pixar’s upcoming film, “Soul” – director Pete Docter, producer Dana Murray, and co-director Kemp Powers – are joined by Dr. Johnnetta Cole and Jon Batiste to offer an exclusive sneak peek at the film.

To see the little featurette, you need to RSVP by following this link. The Soul portion of the event will run live from 6:44PM to 6:54PM ET. Since it’s live, we’ll be tuning in a bit earlier to make sure we don’t miss anything!

 

For many of us, Soul is acting a bit like a light at the end of a very long tunnel. We’re hoping that November 20th won’t just feel a bit more normal, but also better than the previous ‘normal’. I’ll leave you with this lovely quote from Pete Docter that has seen me through a lot.

“It’s like you run into this dark tunnel, trusting that somewhere there’s another end to it where you’re going to come out. And there’s a point in the middle where it’s just dark. There’s no light from where you came in and there’s no light at the other end; all you can do is keep running. And then you start to see a little light, and a little more light, and then, bam! You’re out in the sun.”

 

UPDATE:

Here’s the sneak peek and conversation with the film makers in case you missed it:

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Soul’s New Release Date: November 20th

Pete Docter, Pixar, Poster, Soul

Posted by Joanna • April 13, 2020

Soul, Pixar’s next original movie directed by Pete Docter, has been pushed back from it’s original release date of June 19th to November 20th. This means it will land on the weekend before Thanksgiving.

Many movies have been delayed due to the coronavirus pandemic. This is the first official word of Soul being pushed back, but it doesn’t come as a surprise.

Other movies with less notice have had to resort to straight-to-digital release, but with lockdown effects likely to be differing around the world come June, a delayed release seems the more sensible choice. It was revealed last week that a number of Pixar employees have been put on furlough – perhaps this would have had an effect on the completion and marketing of the film as well.

Soul was originally set to share a ‘release date birthday’ with Inside Out (another of Docter’s films).

Bring on November 20th – hopefully this new date will see us in a much more familiar world and will allow us to experience the film for the first time in an exciting crowded theatre.

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The newest Soul trailer is dazzling

Soul, Trailer

Posted by Simoa • March 12, 2020

“Is all this living really worth dying for?”

It definitely recalls Inside Out, but there’s still something totally unique about Soul. For instance, there’s a regular outside world juxtaposed against a stunning interior one. The animation and character designs are also ones we’ve never yet seen in a Pixar movie. Those, along with the premise, are what I find most exciting about Soul. This trailer is also gorgeous: the vibrant colors make me want to jump right into this world. Already seems like a harmonious blend, and in a film with jazz music to boot!

Joe Gardner (Jamie Foxx) is a middle-school band teacher who gets the chance of a lifetime to play at the best jazz club in town. But one small misstep takes him from the streets of New York City to The Great Before—a fantastical place where new souls get their personalities, quirks, and interests before they go to Earth. Determined to return to his life, Joe teams up with a precocious soul, 22 (Tina Fey), who has never understood the appeal of the human experience. As Joe desperately tries to show 22 what’s great about living, he may just discover the answers to some of life’s most important questions.

With the voice talents of Jamie Foxx, Tina Fey, Angela Bassett, Phylicia Rashad, Daveed Diggs, and Questlove, Soul will be in theaters on June 19th of this year.

 

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